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Metapolemische und ideengeschichtliche Betrachtungen zum Initialband der Restaurationsschrift Karl Ludwig von Hallers
Studien zu Leben und Werk
Studien zur Grundproblematik der Marx'schen Gesellschaftskritik
Zwei Perspektiven der Demokratie

: University of Ne- braska Press. Young, Iris M. (1990): Justice and the Politics of Difference, Princeton: Princeton University Press. Yu, Jiyuan (2005): Confucius’ Relational Self and Aristotle’s Political Animal, History of Philosophy Quarterly, 22 (4), pp. 281-300. Zaman, Muhammad Q. (2006): The Ulama of Contemporary Islam and their Con- ceptions of the Common Good, in: Armando Salvatore and Dale F. Eickelman (eds.), Public Islam and the Common Good, Boston/Leiden: Brill, pp. 129– 155. Zhang, Ellen (2010): Community, the Common Good, and Public Healthcare

also be found in Confucianism. Cf. Yu, Jiyuan (2005): Confucius’ Relational Self and Aristotle’s Political Animal, History of Philosophy Quarterly, 22 (4), pp. 281-300. 85 Accordingly, the economic and social scientific ideal of humankind as homo oeconomi- cus, i.e. as a socially unbound and instrumentally rational utility maximizer, is not only an ethically questionable but above all an extraordinarily weak explanation. See thereto Taylor, Charles (1989): Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity, Cam- bridge: Cambridge University Press. 48

’s Political Animal, History of Philosophy Quarterly, 22 (4), pp. 281-300. Zaman, Muhammad Q. (2006): The Ulama of Contemporary Islam and their Con- ceptions of the Common Good, in: Armando Salvatore and Dale F. Eickelman (eds.), Public Islam and the Common Good, Boston/Leiden: Brill, pp. 129– 155. Zhang, Ellen (2010): Community, the Common Good, and Public Healthcare, Confucianism and its Relevance to Contemporary China, Public Health Eth- ics, 3 (3), pp 259-266. Zunshine, Lisa (2008): Strange Concepts and the Stories They Make Possible, Baltimore: The John Hopkins

activity. In a deep challenge to the very deeply ingrained idea of the progres- sive history of philosophy (and science), Deleuze claims that ‘we don’t revise a theory, but construct new ones’ (1992b: 208). The full ramifications of this were not developed until Deleuze and Guattari’s (1994) last work together, What is Philosophy? Here, however, the implication is that for philosophy to be useful it must co-create in the set of relays it can establish between the multi- ple individual and the multiple group; that is, at the level of the ‘groupuscles’ engaged in