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this binarity, constitutes a “practice of everyday life.”41 This idea is important for dance research, since dancing is a corporeal practice that always takes place in the interplay between the act of carrying something out and the act of performing it. identity and difference Translation is subject to the paradoxical rela­ tionship between identity and difference. The paradox lies in the way that difference is suspended in translation, that is, in the idea that the translated should be identical with the ‘original.’ At the same time, identity can only be

all kinds of bric­a­brac during their research trip there and spoke with many artists and companions on the same weekend that Viktor Orban closed Hungary’s borders due to the so­called “refugee crisis,” initiating a momentous turning point in the history of the European Union. In Brazil, I was astonished to find that – unlike in Germany – there was a young generation of dancers and dance researchers who saw no contradiction between contemporary dance and dance theater. In Japan, I was fascinated by the passionate, empathetic way that young artists and

discourse that it is possible to make statements in the first place. In this understan d­ ing, dance must also be seen as a language that can be explored semiotically. It was on the basis of this approach that Susan Foster suggested a perspective in the 1980s that regards the dancing body as something that is always discursive, ‘legible’ and that is a contin­ uous producer of codes that can be read and interpreted as cultural signifiers.6 In the 1990s, Gabriele Brandstetter in particular drew parallels between dance and writing in German­language dance research

, developments that have taken place in the media landscape and in light of digitalization: in the 1960s, the artwork itself and its performance formats were regarded as objects of criticism (–› pieces), but since the 2000s,20 ‘conceptual dance’ and dance research have shifted the focus toward artistic practice, which is now in itself considered to be the “site of criticism.” 21 From the point of view of conceptual dance, criticism is not so much judgment as a mode of working that makes ‘other’ experiences and approaches to the world possible. However, some theoretical

Politics, Oxford: University Press, pp. 181­198. Siegmund, Gerald (2018): “Doing the Contemporary: Pina Bausch as a Conceptual Artist.” In: Dance Research Journal, 50/2, pp.15­30. Simmel, Georg (1896): “Socio­ logische Aesthetik.” In: Die Zukunft 17/5, pp. 204­216. Silbermann, Alphons (1986): Empi­ rische Kunstsoziologie: Eine Ein­ führung, Wiesbaden: Springer. Sloterdijk, Peter (1989): Euro taoismus: Zur Kritik der politischen Kinetik, Frankfurt a.M.: Suhrkamp. Sossin, Mark (2007): “History and Future of the Kestenberg Move­ ment Profile.” In: Susanne

Abstract

This volumeprovides new, ground-breaking perspectives on the globally renowned work of the Tanztheater Wuppertal and its iconic founder and artistic director, Pina Bausch. The company's performances, how it developed its productions, the global transfer of its choreographic material and the reactions of audiences and critics are explained as complex, interdependent and reciprocal processes of translation. This is the first book to focus on the artistic research conducted for the Tanztheater's international coproductions and features extensive interviews with dancers, collaborators and spectators and provides first-hand ethnographic insights into the work process. By introducing the praxeology of translation as a key methodological concept for dance research, Gabriele Klein argues that Pina Bausch's lasting legacy is defined by an entanglement of temporalities that challenges the notion of contemporaneity.

Abstract

This volumeprovides new, ground-breaking perspectives on the globally renowned work of the Tanztheater Wuppertal and its iconic founder and artistic director, Pina Bausch. The company's performances, how it developed its productions, the global transfer of its choreographic material and the reactions of audiences and critics are explained as complex, interdependent and reciprocal processes of translation. This is the first book to focus on the artistic research conducted for the Tanztheater's international coproductions and features extensive interviews with dancers, collaborators and spectators and provides first-hand ethnographic insights into the work process. By introducing the praxeology of translation as a key methodological concept for dance research, Gabriele Klein argues that Pina Bausch's lasting legacy is defined by an entanglement of temporalities that challenges the notion of contemporaneity.

Abstract

This volumeprovides new, ground-breaking perspectives on the globally renowned work of the Tanztheater Wuppertal and its iconic founder and artistic director, Pina Bausch. The company's performances, how it developed its productions, the global transfer of its choreographic material and the reactions of audiences and critics are explained as complex, interdependent and reciprocal processes of translation. This is the first book to focus on the artistic research conducted for the Tanztheater's international coproductions and features extensive interviews with dancers, collaborators and spectators and provides first-hand ethnographic insights into the work process. By introducing the praxeology of translation as a key methodological concept for dance research, Gabriele Klein argues that Pina Bausch's lasting legacy is defined by an entanglement of temporalities that challenges the notion of contemporaneity.

Abstract

This volumeprovides new, ground-breaking perspectives on the globally renowned work of the Tanztheater Wuppertal and its iconic founder and artistic director, Pina Bausch. The company's performances, how it developed its productions, the global transfer of its choreographic material and the reactions of audiences and critics are explained as complex, interdependent and reciprocal processes of translation. This is the first book to focus on the artistic research conducted for the Tanztheater's international coproductions and features extensive interviews with dancers, collaborators and spectators and provides first-hand ethnographic insights into the work process. By introducing the praxeology of translation as a key methodological concept for dance research, Gabriele Klein argues that Pina Bausch's lasting legacy is defined by an entanglement of temporalities that challenges the notion of contemporaneity.

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Abstract

This volumeprovides new, ground-breaking perspectives on the globally renowned work of the Tanztheater Wuppertal and its iconic founder and artistic director, Pina Bausch. The company's performances, how it developed its productions, the global transfer of its choreographic material and the reactions of audiences and critics are explained as complex, interdependent and reciprocal processes of translation. This is the first book to focus on the artistic research conducted for the Tanztheater's international coproductions and features extensive interviews with dancers, collaborators and spectators and provides first-hand ethnographic insights into the work process. By introducing the praxeology of translation as a key methodological concept for dance research, Gabriele Klein argues that Pina Bausch's lasting legacy is defined by an entanglement of temporalities that challenges the notion of contemporaneity.