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Designing Self-Care Affect and Debility in #SelfCare Kara Stone Abstract: Are games addicting, anxiety-provoking, and manipulative, or are they calming, connecting, and healing? This paper looks at the companion game app #SelfCare by studio TRU LUV and collaborator Eve Thomas alongside af fect theory on psychosocial disability (of ten referred to as mental illness). #SelfCare consists of mini-games navigated through a home screen of a person lying in bed under the covers who »refuses to leave bed today.« The mini-games are all uncompetitive, unscored, and

Interdisziplinäre Betrachtungen

scar tissue, the music is both witness to violence and the healing response: arousing pathos, even challenging to look at, perhaps, but a hope-inspiring testament to survival in the face of threaten- ing experiences. It is a music of self-care and self-awareness, of painful emotio- nal and biographical honesty, simultaneously mourning and celebrating, yet without contradiction. This new honesty surrounding personal struggles within politicised iden- tity categories has been expressed in a wave of albums we might think of as 4 1 ›coming-out albums‹, a description

in POP

endocrinologists’ support or encouragement to use “Going Rogue” 139 one, or for other reasons such as lack of information about the tools (Rodbard 2016). Medical oversight of diabetes and the demands it imposes on patients to manage diet, blood glucose surveillance, and self-care are highly disciplining practices (Foucault 1977). These practices and expectations impose normative assumptions about gender, good and bad behaviors, appropriate and inappropriate standards (Canguilhem 1978), racially-coded norms, and re-inscribe existing inequalities into biomedical practices

’ technologies produce images of life, including ageing, as infinitely modifiable and open to being optimized (Hogle 2005; 2007; Rose 2007). Neoliberal styles of self-care redistribute the capacities of the body across a wider biosocial order of ageing. Further, the biosocial order is one that encourages people to congregate as biocitizens around various diagnoses (Rose/Novas 2005), and more recently, as quantified selves (Barrett et al. 2013; Nafus and Sherman 2014; Ruckenstein forthcoming). Thus, the biosocial order and its incorporation of functional age becomes the

self. It might be that the inconsistent notion of a “quanti- fied self” is so seductive to many because it promises that the self and quantifi- Image 1: Two copies of postcards (front and back) from the On Kawara postcard series I GOT UP. 29 March 1974 (left) and 25 March 1974 (right). Introduction 9 cation could go together well. On Kawara’s work demonstrates in an ironic way that numerical identities do not constitute specific personal identities. The QS movement tries to suggest the opposite. Quantified Self Care When we follow the enthusiasts and listen to the

Francisco (http://openlabresearch.com). Fotopoulou, Aristea/Kate, O’Riordan (2016): “Training to Self-care: Fitness Track- ing, Biopedagogy and the Healthy Consumer.” Health Sociology Review 25(3), pp. 54−69. Freeman, Julie (2012): “Lepidopteral.” Translating Nature (http://www.translat ingnature.org). Galloway, Alex/Eugene, Thacker/Wark, Mackenzie (2014): Excommunication: Three Inquiries into Media and Mediation. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Goatley, Wesley (2016): “Watching Mephitic Air.” London Design Festival, London College of Communication. Haddon

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subject positions are confirmed. But the therapists also attempt to engage in a form of plurality with the older citizen’s phenomenological body; a body that has its own sense of identity and history of lived experiences, andwhich displays a form of ‘messy subjectivity’ that can compli- cate the outcome of the reablement programme.The collaborative partnership they form during training should activate the citizen’s potential for continued labour, action, and self-care, and thus become empowering. However, some older citizens display the identity of a freely

look after basic hygiene and self care may become problems. These problems result in needs for specific rehabilitation programmes such as muscle strengthening, mobility training, voca- tional retraining, and provision of adaptive devices. 3. Handicaps which are experienced during times of active conflict often include being unable to safely earn a living. In post-conflict situa- tions, one may also be stigmatized as a disabled veteran. These problems result in needs for specific community based programmes such as public education, income generation projects