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Post-Foundational Geographies
The Fall and Rise of a Global Borough
Series: Urban Studies
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Benjamin Heim Shepard, Mark J. Noonan Brooklyn Tides Benjamin Heim Shepard is a professor of Human Services at New York City Col- lege of Technology, located across the street from Brooklyn Bridge in the epicen- ter of a rapidly transforming downtown Brooklyn. Much of Shepard’s scholarship is based on the ethnographic study of social services and social movements in New York. He is the author/editor of many books, including Rebel Friendships, The Beach Beneath the Streets and From ACT UP to the WTO: Urban Protest and Community Building in the

the Professional Staff Congress of the City University of New York, where he is a chapter chair at City Tech. He is also the author/editor of ten books including: White Nights and Ascending Shadows: An Oral History of the San Francisco AIDS Epidemic (1997), From ACT UP to the WTO: Urban Protest and Community Building in the Era of Globalization (2002), Queer Political Performance and Protest (Routledge, 2009) The Beach beneath the Streets: Contesting New York’s Public Spaces (with Greg Smithsimon, SUNY Press), Play, Creativity, and Social Movements: If I Can

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.......................................... 53 State of Research .................................................................................55 4.1.1. Urban Protest: The Run-Up to War............................................................ 57 The City at War in Ian McEwan’s Saturday ................................................. 58 4.1.2. Rural Frontlines: The Country at War......................................................... 64 Invading the Pastoral in Pat Barker’s Double Vision ......................................65 4.1.3. In the War Zone: Soldiers and War Correspondents

Berlin. Even today there are hundreds of residential and cultural spaces in the city which emanated from former squats. While different urban protest movements were regaining strength, 2012 marked the increase of many house and place squattings. For example, in June of 2012 retirees squatted their meeting point in the district of Wedding in order to ensure that it would survive. Residents from around the subway station Kott- busser Tor built a "Gecekondu", a hut as a location to meet and protest against rising rents and displacement. The hut is still there and

to Political Conf licts in Niger«, in: African Studies Review 62, S. 49-71. Schritt, Jannik (2019b): »Die erweiterte Fallmethode in der Protestforschung«, in: Forschungsjournal Soziale Bewegungen 32, S. 58-68. Schritt, Jannik (2019c): »Urban protest in oil-age Niger. Towards a notion of ›con- tentious assemblages‹«, in: Sociologus 69, S. 19-36. Slaby, Jan/Mühlhoff, Rainer (2019): »Affekt«, in: Jan Slaby/Christian von Scheve (Hg.), Affective Societies. Key Concepts, Milton: Routledge. Snow, David A./Benford, Robert D. (1988): »Ideology, Frame Resonance and Parti

, in: Forschungsjournal Soziale Bewegungen, Jg. 25 (2012) H. 3, S. 121 – 126. Naegler, Laura: Gentrification and Resistance: cultural criminology, control, and the commodification of urban protest in Hamburg, Berlin 2012. Neidhardt, Friedhelm / Dieter Rucht: Protestgeschichte der Bundesrepublik Deutschland 1950 bis 1994: Ereignisse, Themen, Akteure, in: Rucht, Dieter (Hrsg.): Protest in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland: Strukturen und Entwick- lungen, Frankfurt a.M. 2001, S. 27 – 69. Neumann, Arijana: Das „Jahrzehnt der Parteireform“ – Ein Überblick über die

ACTION NOW. (“Mission Yuppie Eradication Project”) Unsurprisingly, the aggressive rhetoric of the poster is based on a demand- side understanding of gentrification and identifies “yuppie scumbags” as the targets of activism. While this poster does not make explicit use of any theoretical notion (and, though providing a by-the-book description of the process, appears deliberately to avoid the term ‘gentrification’), a later poster from 1999 alludes to a key moment of urban protest and thus suggests familiarity with a tradition of theoretically informed activism

show ‘the potential of the temporary and the mobile to refigure the city around spaces that were dormant, disregarded or dead’ (Tonkiss, 2013:322), but also and especially the importance of laying claim to public space and produ- cing new regimes of publicity by an active, collective self-management of the city (Harvey, 2012). Both everyday, piecemeal reappropriations of the streets and massive urban protests can be assembled through activist urbanisms to engender novel forms of urban commoning that palliate the crisis of formal social reproduction and create