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analyzing the practices that constitute 1 What is striking in Zawadzki’s statement is the uncritical – and de facto legitimiz- ing – use of the antisemitic myth of »Jew-Communism« [ ydokomuna]. For an analytical study, see Zawadzka (2007). it. We find that, where there has been culturally consolidated and prolonged violence against minorities, reworking and rejecting the patterns that repro- duce and perpetuate discrimination turns out to be extremely difficult. The old forms of subordination give way to new

New Directions in Game Research

Archiving Racial Violence Some reflections from the UK’s Institute of Race Relations Eddie Bruce-Jones1 »And here we would like to explain that what black people understand by self- defence is not, as popularly believed, the mounting of vigilante groups inflicting random and racially-motivated revenge attacks on the ›host community‹ or the taking of the law into one’s own hands. What self-defence means to them is a way of ensuring the rights that every member of the white population takes for grant- ed: that children return unmolested from school, workers

Innovative Approaches in Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Arab Region
Series: Urban Studies

The Aftermath of Violence The Post-Coup Second Generation in Chile DANIELA JARA Between the years 1970 and 1973, a dramatic process of social polarization deeply divided Chilean society. During the government of Unidad Popular1, the president Salvador Allende attempted to turn Chile into a socialist state through an agenda of nationalization, statization and land reform. His program of radical transformations was strongly opposed by local elites, resulting in the September 11th military coup. As a result and during the bombing of El Palacio de la

Apologising for Colonial Violence The Documentary Film Regresso a Wiriyamu, Transitional Justice, and Portuguese-Mozambican Decolonisation ROBERT STOCK When Aníbal Cavaco Silva, President of Portugal, went for a state visit to the Mozambican capital Maputo in March 2008, he was asked by a journal- ist if he would apologise for the ‘colonial war’, namely for the massacre of Wiriyamu where about 400 people were killed by Portuguese special for- ces. He responded: “People make history every day, with all its defects and virtues. Regarding history, I

Violence, Communication and Imagination Pre-Modern, Totalitarian and Liberal-Democratic Torture WERNER BINDER This contribution examines the practice of torture from a comparative perspective and with regard to its communicative realization in public and related social imaginaries. Nowadays, at the beginning of the 21st century, a state will rarely call its own practices “torture”, but that was not always the case. In European history torture has often been considered to be an integral part of judicial processes. It was only in the last 200 years that “torture

Violence, Communication and Imagination Pre-Modern, Totalitarian and Liberal-Democratic Torture WERNER BINDER This contribution examines the practice of torture from a comparative perspective and with regard to its communicative realization in public and related social imaginaries. Nowadays, at the beginning of the 21st century, a state will rarely call its own practices “torture”, but that was not always the case. In European history torture has often been considered to be an integral part of judicial processes. It was only in the last 200 years that “torture

Cinematic Violence and Ideological Transgression The Family in Crisis in the 1977 Horror Film The Hills Have Eyes Lee Herrmann, Università di Torino Since its birth cinema has featured graphic violence, herein defined as the direct visual depiction of injury to the body (Kendrick, Hollywood 6). Fiction might be packaged as reality: the staged Shooting Captured Insurgents, an 1898 re-enactment of a war crime from the Spanish-American War, uses a documentary presentation making for, in the words of film scholar James Kendrick, “a surprisingly disturbing forty

261 Violence Prevention in a South African Township KOSTA MATHÉY South Africa’s townships count amongst the places with the highest indices for violence and crime worldwide. The causes for this are complex and spe- cific to the place; therefore attempts towards violence reduction necessarily need to be multi-dimensional, too. The paper describes the suggested ap- proach for a German cooperation project for Khayelitsha Township near Cape Town. The project has recently started in the field.1 Increasing presence of violence has become a major