Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Subordination in English

Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives

Ed. by Seoane, Elena / Acuña-Fariña, Carlos / Palacios-Martínez, Ignacio

Series:Topics in English Linguistics [TiEL] 101

eBook (PDF)
Publication Date:
July 2018
Copyright year:
2018
ISBN
978-3-11-058357-1
See all formats and pricing

From flying Sancho to swooning Altisidora: The changing use of premodifying present participles in three English translations of Cervantes’ Don Quijote

Smet, Hendrik De

Abstract

Over the Modern period, English has come to make increasing use of situation-oriented present participles to structure narrative texts. Situation-oriented participles are premodifying participles that function as compressed subordinate clauses, relating one event to another. For example, in He hauled the sobbing boy to his feet (British National Corpus, BNC), the event denoted by the participle (sobbing) is construed as backgrounded and approximately simultaneous to the event of the higher clause (hauled). Because situation-oriented participles are used in a specifically clause-like way, their rise can be thought of as a departure from the adjectival character of premodifying participles, and by that token as an instance of functional verbalization. In this chapter, the rise of situation- oriented participles is addressed through a close analysis of their use in three successive English translations of Cervantes’ Don Quijote, roughly representative of Early Modern English, Late Modern English and Present-day English. As in untranslated fiction, the use of situation-oriented participles increases over the three translations. Closer quantitative and qualitative analysis reveals that situation-oriented participles are employed with growing freedom in the successive translations. Situation-oriented participles are increasingly used in contexts where the Spanish original offers a different construal of event relations. Moreover, there are indications that the simultaneity requirement, to which their use is subject, is loosened in Present-day English. This confirms that over time situation-oriented participles became more prominent as a grammatical resource available to English authors and translators.

Citation Information

Hendrik De Smet (2018). From flying Sancho to swooning Altisidora: The changing use of premodifying present participles in three English translations of Cervantes’ Don Quijote. In Elena Seoane, Carlos Acuña-Fariña, Ignacio Palacios-Martínez (Eds.), Subordination in English: Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives (pp. 25–42). Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110583571-002

Book DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110583571

Online ISBN: 9783110583571

© 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Munich/BostonGet Permission

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in