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Acta Medica Martiniana

The Journal of Comenius University in Bratislava

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1335-8421
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Amplitude-Integrated Electroencephalography: Classification and Possibilities of Use in Practice

Z. Zimova
  • Dept. of Neonatology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University and University Hospital, Martin, Slovak Republic
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ K. Matasova
  • Dept. of Neonatology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University and University Hospital, Martin, Slovak Republic
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ M. Zibolen
  • Dept. of Neonatology, Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University and University Hospital, Martin, Slovak Republic
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  • Other articles by this author:
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Published Online: 2015-06-16 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/acm-2015-0004

Abstract

Amplitude-integrated electroencephalography (aEEG) is a simplified bedside neurophysiology tool that has become widely used in neonates in the last few years. Although aEEG cannot replace conventional EEG (cEEG) for background monitoring and detection of seizures, it remains a useful apparatus that complements conventional EEG, is being widely adopted by neonatologists, and should be supported by neonatal neurologists. Limited channel leads are applied to the patient and data are displayed in a semilogarithmic, time-compressed scale. In term neonates, aEEG has been used to determine the prognosis and treatment for those affected by hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, seizures, meningitis and even congenital heart disease. In preterm infants, normative values and pattern corresponding to gestational age are being established. The senzitivity and specificity of aEEG are enhanced by the display of a simultaneous raw EEG.

Keywords : amplitude integrated EEG; classification; sleep-wake cycle; preterm neonates; seizures

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About the article

Received: 2015-03-22

Accepted: 2015-04-10

Published Online: 2015-06-16

Published in Print: 2015-05-01


Citation Information: Acta Medica Martiniana, Volume 15, Issue 1, Pages 27–35, ISSN (Online) 1335-8421, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/acm-2015-0004.

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© by Z. Zimova. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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