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American Mineralogist

Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials

Ed. by Baker, Don / Xu, Hongwu / Swainson, Ian


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 2.631

CiteScore 2018: 2.55

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.355
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 1.103

Online
ISSN
1945-3027
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Volume 88, Issue 10

Issues

Fe and Ni impurities in synthetic diamond

Yue Meng
  • Corresponding author
  • HPCAT & Carnegie Institution of Washington, Advanced Photon Source Building 434E, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
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  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Matthew Newville
  • Consortium for Advanced Radiation Source, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Steve Sutton
  • Consortium for Advanced Radiation Source, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
  • Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, U.S.A.
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ John Rakovan / Ho-Kwang Mao
Published Online: 2015-03-31 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am-2003-1018

Abstract

Using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microanalysis, including XRF tomography, and Xray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analyses, the distribution, and nature of incorporation of Fe and Ni impurities in as-grown diamond crystals, synthesized under high-pressure and hightemperature (HPHT) conditions, have been characterized. We find significantly different behavior for Fe and Ni as impurities in diamond. Nickel is dispersed and sector-zoned, with concentrations in {111} growth sectors at least 3 times those in {100} sectors, whereas Fe exists in the form of microaggregates or clusters with no observable sector correlation. Fe K-edge XANES shows that Fe is oxidized in diamond and has a valence of 2+. Comparison of XANES spectra from numerous standard compounds indicates that Fe is very likely bonded with oxygen as FeO.

About the article

Received: 2002-12-18

Accepted: 2003-05-31

Published Online: 2015-03-31

Published in Print: 2003-10-01


Citation Information: American Mineralogist, Volume 88, Issue 10, Pages 1555–1559, ISSN (Online) 1945-3027, ISSN (Print) 0003-004X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am-2003-1018.

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© 2015 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin/Boston.

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