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American Mineralogist

Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials

Ed. by Baker, Don / Xu, Hongwu / Swainson, Ian


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 2.645

CiteScore 2017: 2.31

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 1.440
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 1.059

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1945-3027
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Volume 92, Issue 10

Issues

Letter: High-precision oxygen isotope analysis of picogram samples reveals 2 μm gradients and slow diffusion in zircon

F. Zeb Page
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  • Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, Wisconsin 53706, U.S.A.
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/ T. Ushikubo
  • Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, Wisconsin 53706, U.S.A.
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/ N.T. Kita
  • Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, Wisconsin 53706, U.S.A.
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/ L.R. Riciputi / J.W. Valley
  • Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, Wisconsin 53706, U.S.A.
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  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2015-04-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am.2007.2697

Abstract

Ion microprobe analysis with a sub-micrometer diameter spot reveals a sharp, 2 μm gradient in oxygen isotope ratio proving that oxygen diffusion in zircon is slow even under prolonged high-grade metamorphism. The data are consistent with an oxygen diffusion coefficient of 10-23.5±1 cm2/s. Furthermore, this gradient is found in a zircon that contains clear textural evidence of recrystallization in nearby regions. This finding shows that through careful textural and chemical analysis, primary information can be extracted from a zircon that has also undergone partial recrystallization. The oxygen isotope ratios found in zircon have been used to infer magmatic and pre-magmatic histories, including the presence of liquid water on the surface of earliest Earth. Recently, these interpretations have been questioned with the assertion that zircon may not retain its primary oxygen isotope signature through metamorphism. The slow diffusion confirmed by these results supports interpretations that assume preservation of magmatic compositions.

Keywords: Ion microprobe; SIMS; zircon; diffusion; oxygen isotopes; stable isotopes; granulites facies; migmatites

About the article

Received: 2007-05-16

Accepted: 2007-06-14

Published Online: 2015-04-01

Published in Print: 2007-10-01


Citation Information: American Mineralogist, Volume 92, Issue 10, Pages 1772–1775, ISSN (Online) 1945-3027, ISSN (Print) 0003-004X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am.2007.2697.

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