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American Mineralogist

Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials

Ed. by Baker, Don / Xu, Hongwu / Swainson, Ian


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 2.631

CiteScore 2018: 2.55

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.355
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 1.103

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1945-3027
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Volume 97, Issue 10

Issues

Solubility of xenotime in a 2 M HCl aqueous fluid from 1.2 to 2.6 GPa and 300 to 500 °C

Elizabeth A. Tanis
  • Corresponding author
  • High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4010, U.S.A.
  • Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4010, U.S.A.
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/ Adam Simon
  • High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4010, U.S.A.
  • Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4010, U.S.A.
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/ Oliver Tschauner
  • High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4010, U.S.A.
  • Department of Geoscience, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4010, U.S.A.
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/ Paul Chow
  • HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
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/ Yuming Xiao
  • HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
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/ Gouyin Shen
  • HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
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/ John M. Hanchar
  • Department of Earth Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland A1B 3X5, Canada
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/ Mark Frank
  • Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115, U.S.A.
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Published Online: 2015-04-02 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am.2012.4009

Abstract

Constraining mass transfer of the rare earth elements (REE) and high field strength elements (HFSE) from subducted oceanic crust and metasediments to the mantle wedge is fundamental toward interpreting processes that affect trace element mobility in subduction zone environments. Experimental studies of the partitioning of trace elements involving aqueous fluids at P-T conditions appropriate for slab-mantle wedge conditions are complicated by the difficulties in retrieving the fluid. Here we present the results from an application of an in situ technique that permits quantitative determination of element concentrations in aqueous fluid at geologically relevant supercritical conditions. We focus on pressures and temperatures appropriate for devolatilization-induced element transfer in subduction zone environments, and conditions obtained during regional metamorphism. In this study, we used a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) and in situ synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) to quantify the concentration of Y, an important trace element often used as a proxy for the heavy REE in geologic systems, in a xenotime-saturated 2 M HCl-aqueous fluid at 1.19 to 2.6 GPa and 300-500 °C. At these pressures and temperatures the solubility of yttrium ranges from 2400 to 2850 ppm. We find that the concentration of Y decreases with increasing fluid density. These new data, combined with published data generated from experiments done at lower pressure, in fluids of nearly identical composition and also NaCl-H2O fluids, constrain the effects of pressure and temperature on the ability of aqueous fluid containing Cl to scavenge and transport Y and, by analogy, the HREE. Although the physical properties of Y are similar to the high field strength elements, Y exhibits geochemical behavior that is analogous to the heavy rare earth elements (HREE).

Keywords : Synchrotron; subduction; aqueous fluid; metasomatism; fluid transfer; hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell; xenotime; rare earth elements; yttrium

About the article

Received: 2011-09-23

Accepted: 2012-06-06

Published Online: 2015-04-02

Published in Print: 2012-10-01


Citation Information: American Mineralogist, Volume 97, Issue 10, Pages 1708–1713, ISSN (Online) 1945-3027, ISSN (Print) 0003-004X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am.2012.4009.

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