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American Mineralogist

Journal of Earth and Planetary Materials

Ed. by Baker, Don / Xu, Hongwu / Swainson, Ian


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 2.631

CiteScore 2018: 2.55

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.355
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 1.103

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1945-3027
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Volume 98, Issue 10

Issues

Bonding and electronic changes in rhodochrosite at high pressure

Gabriela A. Farfan
  • Corresponding author
  • Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, U.S.A.
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/ Eglantine Boulard
  • Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, U.S.A.
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/ Shibing Wang
  • Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, U.S.A.
  • SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, U.S.A
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/ Wendy L. Mao
  • Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, U.S.A.
  • 3 Photon Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, U.S.A.
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Published Online: 2015-03-07 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am.2013.4497

Abstract

Atmospheric carbon is critical for maintaining the climate and life equilibrium on Earth. The concentration of this carbon is controlled by the deep carbon cycle, which is responsible for the billion year-scale evolution of the terrestrial carbon reservoirs of the planet. Understanding the crystal chemistry and physical properties of carbonates at mantle conditions is vital as they represent the main oxidized carbon-bearing phases in the Earth’s mantle. Here we present data on the crystal chemistry and physical properties of rhodochrosite at high pressure.

Rhodochrosite (MnCO3) exhibits a series of high-pressure transitions between 15 and 30 GPa and at 50 GPa at ambient temperature as observed by in situ Raman spectroscopy, X‑ray diffraction (XRD), and X‑ray emission spectroscopy (XES). A transition is observed to begin at 15 GPa and complete at 30 GPa, which may be due to several possibilities: modifications in the magnetic order, changes in the compression mechanism, and/or a structural transition resulting from disorder. We also observed a first-order phase transition of MnCO3 at 50 GPa, which is not accompanied by any changes in the electronic spin state. These results highlight the unique behavior of MnCO3, which we found to be quite different from other common carbonates such as siderite, magnesite, and calcite.

Keywords : Rhodochrosite; deep carbon; Raman spectroscopy; XES; XRD; high pressure; carbonate

About the article

Received: 2013-02-05

Accepted: 2013-06-18

Published Online: 2015-03-07

Published in Print: 2013-10-01


Citation Information: American Mineralogist, Volume 98, Issue 10, Pages 1817–1823, ISSN (Online) 1945-3027, ISSN (Print) 0003-004X, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2138/am.2013.4497.

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© 2015 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin/Boston.

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