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Altorientalische Forschungen

Ed. by Novák, Mirko / Hazenbos, Joost / Mittermayer, Catherine / Suter, Claudia E.


CiteScore 2018: 0.21

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.137
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2196-6761
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Volume 42, Issue 1

Issues

Question of Style: The Use of Qualitative and Quantitative Methods to Assess the Significance of First Millennium BCE Ivory Carving Traditions

Arianna Cinquatti
Published Online: 2016-03-11 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/aofo-2015-0003

Abstract

This paper presents a stylistic analysis of male, female and sphinx figurine heads, found in the Burnt Palace, the North-West Palace and Fort Shalmaneser at Nimrud with the aim to assess the significance of the main Levantine ivory carving traditions, i.e. North Syrian, Phoenician and Intermediate, as postulated by scholars. The ivories are analysed from both a qualitative and a quantitative perspective, which together point out the diagnostic visual traits characterizing each style and the statistical difference among these groupings. Since stylistic classifications of Levantine ivories have been mainly based on visual inspection by assembling ‘similar with similar’ (Winter 2005), the use of statistics represents a complementary and less subjective method to identify different stylistic traditions and highlight patterns of interactions among them.

Keywords: Levantine Ivories; Stylistic Traditions; Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis; Figurine Heads

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About the article

Published Online: 2016-03-11

Published in Print: 2015-06-01


Citation Information: Altorientalische Forschungen, Volume 42, Issue 1, Pages 46–58, ISSN (Online) 2196-6761, ISSN (Print) 0232-8461, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/aofo-2015-0003.

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