Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Acta Parasitologica

4 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2016: 1.160
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.185

CiteScore 2016: 1.24

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.532
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.721

Online
ISSN
1896-1851
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 61, Issue 1 (Jan 2016)

Issues

Phylogenetic relationships among Linguatula serrata isolates from Iran based on 18S rRNA and mitochondrial cox1 gene sequences

Seyed Ali Ghorashi
  • Corresponding author
  • School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678, Australia
  • Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678, Australia
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Mousa Tavassoli / Andrew Peters
  • School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678, Australia
  • Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678, Australia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Shokoofeh Shamsi
  • School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678, Australia
  • Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation, NSW Department of Primary Industries and Charles Sturt University, NSW 2678, Australia
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Naser Hajipour
Published Online: 2015-12-30 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ap-2015-0027

Abstract

The phylogenetic relationships among seven Linguatula serrata (L. serrata) isolates collected from cattle, goats, sheep, dogs and camels in different geographical locations of Iran were investigated using partial 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences. The nucleotide sequences were analysed in order to determine the phylogenetic relationships between the isolates. Higher sequence diversity and intraspecies variation was observed in the cox1 gene compared to 18S rRNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the cox1 gene placed all L. serrata isolates in a sister clade to L. arctica. The Mantel regression analysis revealed no association between genetic variations and host species or geographical location, perhaps due to the small sample size. However, genetic variations between L. serrata isolates in Iran and those isolated in other parts of the world may exist and could reveal possible evolutionary relationships.

Keywords : Linguatula serrata; molecular phylogenetic; 18S rRNA; cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1

References

  • Alborzi A., Molayan P.H., Akbari M. 2013. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata Nymphs in Mesenteric Lymph Nodes of Cattle and Buffaloes Slaughtered in Ahvaz Abattoir, Iran. Iranian Journal of Parasitology, 8, 327-332Google Scholar

  • Beaver P.C. 1984. Clinical parasitology. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger Google Scholar

  • Drabick J.J. 1987. Pentastomiasis. Review of Infectious Diseases, 9, 1087-1094 el-Hassan A.M., Eltoum I.A., CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • el-Asha B.M. 1991. The Marrara syndrome: isolation of Linguatula serrata nymphs from a patient and the viscera of goats. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 85, 309CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Fard S.R., Ghalekhani N., Kheirandish R., Fathi S., Asl E.N. 2012. The prevalence of Linguatula serrata nymphs in camels slaughtered in Mashhad slaughterhouse, Northeast, Iran. Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine, 2, 885-888. DOI:10.1016/S2221-1691(12)60247-0CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Gjerde B. 2013. Phylogenetic position of Linguatula arctica and Linguatula serrata (Pentastomida) as inferred from the nuclear 18S rRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene. Parasitology Research, 112, 3517-3525. DOI:10.1007/s00436-013-3534-9CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • Gul A., Deger S., Denizhan V. 2009. The prevalence of Linguatula serrata (Frohlich, 1789) nymphs in sheep in the Van province. Turkiye parazitolojii dergisi / Turkiye Parazitoloji Dernegi - Acta Parasitologica Turcica/Turkish Society for Parasitology, 33, 25-27Google Scholar

  • Hendrix C.M. 1998. Diagnostic veterinary parasitology. St. Louis, MO: Mosby Google Scholar

  • Khalil G.M. 1976. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata infection in animals from the Cairo abattoir. The Journal of Parasitology, 62, 126CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Khalil G.M., Schacher J.F. 1965. Linguatula serrata in relation to halzoun and the marrara syndrome. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 14, 736-746Google Scholar

  • Koehsler M., Walochnik J., Georgopoulos M., Pruente C., Boeckeler W., Auer H., Barisani-Asenbauer T. 2011. Linguatula serrata tongue worm in human eye, Austria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17, 870-872. DOI:10.3201/eid1705.100790Web of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Maleky F. 2001. A case report of Linguatula serrata in human throat from Tehran, central Iran. Indian Journal of Medical Sciences, 55, 439-441Google Scholar

  • Meshgi B., Asgarian O. 2003. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata infestation in stray dogs of Shahrekord, Iran. Journal of Veterinary Medicine. B, Infectious diseases and veterinary public health, 50, 466-467CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Oluwasina O.S., Thankgod O.E., Augustine O.O., Gimba F.I. 2014. Linguatula serrata (Porocephalida: Linguatulidae) Infection among Client-Owned Dogs in Jalingo, North Eastern Nigeria: Prevalence and Public Health Implications. Journal of Parasitology Research, 2014:916120. DOI:10.1155/2014/ 916120CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Ravindran R., Lakshmanan B., Ravishankar C., Subramanian H. 2008. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata in domestic ruminants in South India. The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 39, 808-812Google Scholar

  • Rezaei F., Tavassoli M., Javdani M. 2012. Prevalence and morphological characterizations of Linguatula serrata nymphs in camels in Isfahan Province, Iran. Veterinary Research Forum, 3, 61-65.Google Scholar

  • Shakerian A., Shekarforoush S.S., Ghafari Rad H. 2008. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata nymphs in one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) in Najaf-Abad, Iran. Research in Veterinary Science, 84, 243-245. DOI:10.1016/j.rvsc.2007.04.015CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • Tavassoli M., Tajic H., Dalir-Naghadeh B., Hariri F. 2007. Prevalence of Linguatula serrata nymphs and gross changes of infected mesenteric lymph nodes in sheep in Urmia, Iran. Small Ruminant Research, 72, 73-76. DOI 10.1016/j.smallrumres. 2006.08.013Web of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Thompson J.D., Higgins D.G., Gibson T.J. 1994. CLUSTAL W: improving the sensitivity of progressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weighting, position-specific gap penalties and weight matrix choice. Nucleic Acids Research, 22, 4673-4680CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Young E. 1975. Pentastomiasis (Armillifer and Linguatula sp.) infestations of wild animals in the Kruger National Park. Journal of the South African Veterinary Association, 46, 335-336 Google Scholar

About the article

Received: 2015-02-19

Revised: 2015-07-20

Accepted: 2015-08-29

Published Online: 2015-12-30

Published in Print: 2016-01-01


Citation Information: Acta Parasitologica, ISSN (Online) 1896-1851, ISSN (Print) 1230-2821, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ap-2015-0027.

Export Citation

© 2016. Copyright Clearance Center

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Alireza Sazmand and Anja Joachim
Parasite, 2017, Volume 24, Page 21

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in