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Acta Parasitologica

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Volume 61, Issue 1 (Jan 2016)

Issues

Assessing the influence of geographic distance in parasite communities of an exotic lizard

Castiele Holanda Bezerra
  • Corresponding author
  • Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Recursos Naturais, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
  • Núcleo Regional de Ofiologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
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/ Luan Tavares Pinheiro
  • Núcleo Regional de Ofiologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
  • Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia de Vertebrados da Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais. Av. Dom José Gaspar Nº500, Coração Eucarístico, 30535-610, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
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/ Gabriela Cavalcante de Melo
  • Núcleo Regional de Ofiologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
  • Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia de Vertebrados da Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais. Av. Dom José Gaspar Nº500, Coração Eucarístico, 30535-610, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Djan Zanchi-Silva
  • Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Recursos Naturais, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
  • Núcleo Regional de Ofiologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
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/ Murilo de Souza Queiroz
  • UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus de Ilha Solteira, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Biologia e Zootecnia, Ilha Solteira, São Paulo, Brazil
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/ Luciano Alves dos Anjos
  • UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus de Ilha Solteira, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Biologia e Zootecnia, Ilha Solteira, São Paulo, Brazil
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/ David James Harris
  • CIBIO Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, InBIO, Universidade do Porto, Campus Agrário de Vairão, Padre Armando Quintas, Nº 7, 4485-661 Vairão, Vila do Conde, Portugal
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Diva Maria Borges-Nojosa
  • Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ecologia e Recursos Naturais, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
  • Núcleo Regional de Ofiologia, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, 60455-760, Ceará, Brazil
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Published Online: 2015-12-30 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ap-2016-0018

Abstract

The decay of similarity between biological communities with increasing geographical distance is a well-established pattern in ecology, but there are more complex factors acting on host population connections that influence this association for parasite communities, such as parasites’ colonization ability and degree of connectivity between host populations. Here we aim to determine the helminth communities associated with different populations of the host lizard Hemidactylus mabouia, testing if the similarity of parasite communities decreases as the distance between them increases. For this, we collected samples of lizard populations in seven sites from Northeastern coast of Brazil and identified parasite species of helminths and pentastomids in each host, calculated the Sørensen indices of presence/absence and abundance of each pair of communities and related them to the geographical distance. We did not find a relationship of decaying similarity with increasing distance between the parasite communities of the host populations. This can be explained by factors such as the characteristics of the contact between the host populations, and by modes of transmission of most parasite species. Furthermore, it may be related to the exotic nature of the host in Brazil so that parasite communities have not reached equilibrium.

Keywords : Helminths; Hemidactylus mabouia; parasite ecology; species turnover

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About the article

Received: 2015-05-21

Revised: 2015-08-24

Accepted: 2015-10-08

Published Online: 2015-12-30

Published in Print: 2016-01-01


Citation Information: Acta Parasitologica, ISSN (Online) 1896-1851, ISSN (Print) 1230-2821, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ap-2016-0018.

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