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arcadia

International Journal of Literary Culture / Internationale Zeitschrift für literarische Kultur

Ed. by Biti, Vladimir / Liska, Vivian


CiteScore 2018: 0.12

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.122
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.329

Online
ISSN
1613-0642
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Volume 38, Issue 2

Issues

Introduction

Published Online: 2008-02-27 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/arca.38.2.237

Some scientifically oriented people may protest against the notion that the primary link between science and literature is the imagination. Yet scientific discoveries of major importance have often been explained, with hindsight, through a leap of the imagination that bridges the gap between existing and unheard-of – and as yet impossible – states of the world. This role of the imagination, much easier to accept when it comes to the fanciful creations of literature, underlies much of the work of humanists who straddle the border between science and literature. John Neubauer is one such humanist. His article on Bachelard's concept of the imagination in science (1994) testifies to this.

About the article

Published Online: 2008-02-27

Published in Print: 2003-10-14


Citation Information: Arcadia – International Journal for Literary Studies, Volume 38, Issue 2, Pages 237–238, ISSN (Online) 1613-0642, ISSN (Print) 0003-7982, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/arca.38.2.237.

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