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Open Astronomy

formerly Baltic Astronomy

Editor-in-Chief: Barbuy, Beatriz


IMPACT FACTOR 2017 (Baltic Astronomy): 0.417
5-year IMPACT FACTOR (Baltic Astronomy): 0.486

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2543-6376
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Volume 25, Issue 4

Issues

On Utmost Multiplicity of Hierarchical Stellar Systems

Y. M. Gebrehiwot
  • Entoto Observatory and Research Center, Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Division, P.O. Box 33679 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
  • Email
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/ D. A. Kovaleva
  • Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 48 Pyatnitskaya St., Moscow 119017, Russian Federation
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/ A. Yu. Kniazev
  • South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 9, 7935 Observatory, South Africa
  • Southern African Large Telescope Foundation, PO Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa
  • Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 13 Universitetskij Prosp., Moscow 119992, Russian Federation
  • Special Astrophysical Observatory, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnij Arkhyz, Karachai-Cherkessian Republic 369167, Russian Federation
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/ O. Yu. Malkov
  • Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 48 Pyatnitskaya St., Moscow 119017, Russian Federation
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/ N. A. Skvortsov
  • Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, 44-2 Vavilova St., Moscow 119333, Russian Federation
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/ A. V. Karchevsky
  • Faculty of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992, Russian Federation
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/ S. B. Tessema
  • Entoto Observatory and Research Center, Astronomy and Astrophysics Research Division, P.O. Box 33679 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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/ A. O. Zhukov
  • Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences, 48 Pyatnitskaya St., Moscow 119017, Russian Federation
  • Sternberg Astronomical Institute, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 13 Universitetskij Prosp., Moscow 119992, Russian Federation
  • Federal Center of Expertise and Analysis, Russian Ministry of Education and Science, 33-4 Talalikhina St., Moscow 109316, Russian Federation
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Published Online: 2017-03-09 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/astro-2017-0258

Abstract

According to theoretical considerations, multiplicity of hierarchical stellar systems can reach, depending on masses and orbital parameters, several hundred, while observational data confirm the existence of at most septuple (seven-component) systems. In this study, we cross-match the stellar systems of very high multiplicity (six and more components) in modern catalogues of visual double and multiple stars to find among them the candidates to hierarchical systems. After cross-matching the catalogues of closer binaries (eclipsing, spectroscopic, etc.), some of their components were found to be binary/multiple themselves, what increases the system's degree of multiplicity. Optical pairs, known from literature or filtered by the authors, were flagged and excluded from the statistics. We compiled a list of hierarchical systems with potentially very high multiplicity that contains ten objects. Their multiplicity does not exceed 12, and we discuss a number of ways to explain the lack of extremely high multiplicity systems.

Keywords: binaries: general; binaries: visual

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About the article

Received: 2016-11-22

Accepted: 2016-12-14

Published Online: 2017-03-09

Published in Print: 2016-12-01


Citation Information: Open Astronomy, Volume 25, Issue 4, Pages 393–399, ISSN (Online) 2543-6376, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/astro-2017-0258.

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© 2016 Y. M. Gebrehiwot et al., published by De Gruyter Open. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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