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ACTA Universitatis Cibiniensis

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Industrial Application Of Psyllium: An Overview

Rehana Khaliq
  • Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Food Industry and Environmental Protection, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania
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/ Ovidiu Tita
  • Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Food Industry and Environmental Protection, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania
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/ Maria Mihaela Antofie
  • Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Food Industry and Environmental Protection, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania
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/ Camelia Sava
  • Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Food Industry and Environmental Protection, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania
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Published Online: 2015-09-23 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/aucts-2015-0092

Abstract

Plantago ovata is economically an important medicinal plant commonly cultivated in different parts of India, Pakistan and Iran and some part of Europe. It has a long history of traditional uses with healing properties. There are various applications of seed husk and its marketable products for medicine and industrial uses. The seed husk is commonly called as psyllium or isabgol has a potential role in the treatment and prevention of gastrointestinal and bowel diseases. The intent of this review was to highlight the industrial uses of psyllium for the food products and therapeutic purposes. There is also considerable interest of local people, scientific communities and industries in the medical and food supplement application of psyllium husk and mucilage with specific health benefits.

Keywords: Food processing industry; Psyllium; Plantago ovata; Marketable Product; Seed husk

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About the article

Published Online: 2015-09-23

Published in Print: 2015-09-01


Citation Information: ACTA Universitatis Cibiniensis, ISSN (Online) 1583-7149, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/aucts-2015-0092.

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© Khaliq Rehana et al.. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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