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Analyse & Kritik

Journal of Philosophy and Social Theory

Ed. by Baurmann, Michael / Leist, Anton / Tranow, Ulf

Online
ISSN
2365-9858
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Volume 28, Issue 2

Issues

Distributive Justice and Climate Change. The Allocation of Emission Rights

Lukas H. Meyer / Dominic Roser
Published Online: 2016-05-14 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/auk-2006-0207

Abstract

The emission of greenhouse gases causes climate change. Therefore, many support a global cap on emissions. How then should the emissions allowed under this cap be distributed? We first show that above average past emissions cannot be used to justify a right to above average current emissions. We then sketch three basic principles of distributive justice (egalitarianism, prioritarianism, and sufficientarianism) and argue, first, that prioritarian standards are the most plausible and, second, that they speak in favour of giving people of developing countries higher emission rights than people of industrialised countries. In order to support this point it has to be shown, inter alia, in what ways the higher past emissions of industrialised countries are relevant for today’s distribution of emission rights.

About the article

Published Online: 2016-05-14

Published in Print: 2006-11-01


Citation Information: Analyse & Kritik, Volume 28, Issue 2, Pages 223–249, ISSN (Online) 2365-9858, ISSN (Print) 0171-5860, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/auk-2006-0207.

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© 2006 by Lucius & Lucius, Stuttgart.

Citing Articles

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[1]
Lukas H Meyer and Pranay Sanklecha
Politics, Philosophy & Economics, 2014, Volume 13, Number 4, Page 369
[2]
Stephen M. Gardiner
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 2010, Volume 1, Number 1, Page 54
[3]
David R. Morrow
Ethics, Policy & Environment, 2016, Volume 19, Number 3, Page 335
[4]
Richard B. Norgaard
Ecological Economics, 2010, Volume 69, Number 6, Page 1219
[5]
Behnam Taebi
Philosophy & Technology, 2011, Volume 24, Number 2, Page 169
[6]
Behnam Taebi and Jan Leen Kloosterman
Science and Engineering Ethics, 2008, Volume 14, Number 2, Page 177
[7]
Karl Steininger, Christian Lininger, Susanne Droege, Dominic Roser, Luke Tomlinson, and Lukas Meyer
Global Environmental Change, 2014, Volume 24, Page 75
[8]
Carl Knight
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[9]
Carl Knight
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