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Biological Chemistry

Editor-in-Chief: Brüne, Bernhard

Editorial Board: Buchner, Johannes / Lei, Ming / Ludwig, Stephan / Thomas, Douglas D. / Turk, Boris / Wittinghofer, Alfred


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 3.014
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 3.162

CiteScore 2018: 3.09

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.482
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.820

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1437-4315
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Volume 384, Issue 3

Issues

Recombinant RNase Z Does Not Recognize CCA as Part of the tRNA and Its Cleavage Efficieny Is Influenced by Acceptor Stem Length

S. Schiffer / S. Rösch / A. Marchfelder
Published Online: 2005-06-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BC.2003.039

Abstract

One of the essential maturation steps to yield functional tRNA molecules is the removal of 3'-trailer sequences by RNase Z. After RNase Z cleavage the tRNA nucleotidyl transferase adds the CCA sequence to the tRNA 3terminus, thereby generating the mature tRNA. Here we investigated whether a terminal CCA triplet as 3'-trailer or embedded in a longer 3'- trailer influences cleavage site selection by RNase Z using three activities: a recombinant plant RNase Z, a recombinant archaeal RNase Z and an RNase Z active wheat extract. A trailer of only the CCA trinucleotide is left intact by the wheat extract RNase Z but is removed by the recombinant plant and archaeal enzymes. Thus the CCA triplet is not recognized by the RNase Z enzyme itself, but rather requires cofactors still present in the extract. In addition, we investigated the influence of acceptor stem length on cleavage by RNase Z using variants of wildtype tRNATyr. While the wild type and the variant with 8 base pairs in the acceptor stem were processed efficiently by all three activities, variants with shorter and longer acceptor stems were poor substrates or were not cleaved at all.

About the article

Published Online: 2005-06-01

Published in Print: 2003-03-14


Citation Information: Biological Chemistry, Volume 384, Issue 3, Pages 333–342, ISSN (Print) 1431-6730, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BC.2003.039.

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