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Thomas, Douglas D.

Biological Chemistry

Editor-in-Chief: Brüne, Bernhard

Editorial Board Member: Buchner, Johannes / Lei, Ming / Ludwig, Stephan / Sies, Helmut / Turk, Boris / Wittinghofer, Alfred

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Volume 388, Issue 11 (Nov 2007)

Issues

‘Species’ of peptidases

Alan J. Barrett
  • 1Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK
/ Neil D. Rawlings
  • 2Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK
Published Online: 2007-11-02 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BC.2007.151

Abstract

A good system for the naming and classification of peptidases can contribute much to the study of these enzymes. Having already described the building of families and clans in the MEROPS system, we here focus on the lowest level in the hierarchy, in which the huge number of individual peptidase proteins are assigned to a lesser number of what we term ‘species’ of peptidases. Just over 2000 peptidase species are recognised today, but we estimate that 25 000 will one day be known. Each species is built around a peptidase protein that has been adequately characterised. The cluster of peptidase proteins that represent the single species is then assembled primarily by analysis of a sequence ‘tree’ for the family. Each peptidase species is given a systematic identifier and a summary page of data regarding it is assembled. Because the characterisation of new peptidases lags far behind the sequencing, the majority of peptidase proteins are so far known only as amino acid sequences and cannot yet be assigned to species. We suggest that new forms of analysis of the sequences of the unassigned peptidases may give early indications of how they will cluster into the new species of the future.

Keywords: classification; MEROPS database; peptidase species

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Published Online: 2007-11-02

Published in Print: 2007-11-01



Citation Information: Biological Chemistry, ISSN (Online) 14374315, ISSN (Print) 14316730, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BC.2007.151. Export Citation

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