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Biological Chemistry

Editor-in-Chief: Brüne, Bernhard

Editorial Board: Buchner, Johannes / Lei, Ming / Ludwig, Stephan / Sies, Helmut / Thomas, Douglas D. / Turk, Boris / Wittinghofer, Alfred

12 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2016: 3.273

CiteScore 2016: 3.01

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 1.679
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.800

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ISSN
1437-4315
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Volume 390, Issue 1

Issues

Active immunisation against gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) improves blood glucose control in an animal model of obesity-diabetes

Nigel Irwin
  • 1School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, Northern Ireland, UK
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Paula L. McClean
  • 2School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, Northern Ireland, UK
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Steven Patterson
  • 3School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, Northern Ireland, UK
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  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Kerry Hunter
  • 4School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, Northern Ireland, UK
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Peter R. Flatt
  • 5School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA, Northern Ireland, UK
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2008-10-21 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BC.2009.002

Abstract

Recent research suggests that long-term ablation of gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) receptor signalling can reverse or prevent many of the metabolic abnormalities associated with dietary and genetically induced obesity-diabetes. The present study was designed to assess the sub-chronic effects of passive or active immunisation against GIP in ob/ob mice. Initial acute administration of GIP antibody together with oral glucose in ob/ob mice significantly increased the glycaemic excursion compared to controls (p<0.05). This was associated with a significant reduction (p<0.05) in the overall glucose-mediated insulin response. However, sub-chronic passive GIP immunisation was not associated with any changes in body weight, food intake or metabolic control. In contrast, active immunisation against GIP for 56 days in young ob/ob mice resulted in significantly (p<0.05) reduced circulating plasma glucose concentrations on day 56 compared to controls. There was a tendency for decreased circulating insulin in GIP immunised mice. The glycaemic response to intraperitoneal glucose was correspondingly improved (p<0.05) in mice immunised against GIP. Glucose-stimulated insulin levels were not significantly different from controls. Furthermore, insulin sensitivity was similar in mice immunised against GIP and respective controls. Overall, the results reveal that active, as opposed to passive, immunisation against GIP improves blood glucose control ob/ob mice.

Keywords: active immunisation; gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP); GIP antibody; glucose homeostasis; passive immunisation

About the article

Corresponding author


Received: 2008-08-08

Accepted: 2008-09-18

Published Online: 2008-10-21

Published in Print: 2009-01-01


Citation Information: Biological Chemistry, Volume 390, Issue 1, Pages 75–80, ISSN (Online) 1437-4315, ISSN (Print) 1431-6730, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BC.2009.002.

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