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Biological Chemistry

Editor-in-Chief: Brüne, Bernhard

Editorial Board: Buchner, Johannes / Lei, Ming / Ludwig, Stephan / Thomas, Douglas D. / Turk, Boris / Wittinghofer, Alfred


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 3.014
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 3.162

CiteScore 2018: 3.09

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.482
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.820

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1437-4315
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Volume 394, Issue 2

Issues

Cellular microcompartments constitute general suborganellar functional units in cells

Joost C.M. Holthuis
  • Corresponding author
  • Section of Molecular Cell Biology, Department of Biology/Chemistry, University of Osnabrück, Barbarastrasse 13, D-49076 Osnabrück, Germany
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/ Christian Ungermann
  • Corresponding author
  • Section of Biochemistry, Department of Biology/Chemistry, University of Osnabrück, Barbarastrasse 13, D-49076 Osnabrück, Germany
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Published Online: 2013-01-08 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/hsz-2012-0265

Abstract

All cells are compartmentalized to facilitate enzymatic reactions or cellular dynamics. In eukaryotic cells, organelles differ in their protein/lipid repertoire, luminal ion composition, pH, and redox status. In addition, organelles contain specialized subcompartments even within the same membrane or within its lumen. Moreover, the bacterial plasma membrane reveals a remarkable degree of organization, which is recapitulated in eukaryotic cells and often linked to cell signaling. Finally, protein-based compartments are also known in the bacterial and eukaryotic cytosol. As the organizing principle of such cellular subcompartments is likely similar, previous definitions like rafts, microdomains, and all kinds of ‘-somes’ fall short as a general denominator to describe such suborganellar structures. Within this review, we will introduce the term cellular microcompartment as a general suborganellar functional unit and discuss its relevance to understand subcellular organization and function.

Keywords: cellular microcompartment; membrane domain; microdomain; molecular scaffold, organelle

About the article

Joost C.M. Holthuis

Joost C.M. Holthuis is Professor of Molecular Cell Biology at the University of Osnabrück, Germany. He studied medical biology at Utrecht University and received his PhD from the Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, United Kingdom, he worked as associate professor at the Bijvoet Center and Institute of Biomembranes of Utrecht University. Research in his group focuses on membrane lipid metabolism, transport and homeostasis, the underlying protein machinery of lipid converters, sensors and flippases, and how this machinery participates in key cellular and pathological processes.

Christian Ungermann

Christian Ungermann studied Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of Tübingen and at Oregon State University. He received his PhD in Biology at the University of Munich in the laboratory of Prof. Walter Neupert in 1996. He made his postdoctoral research in the Lab of Prof. William Wickner in Hanover, NH, USA, and then became a group leader in 1999 at the University of Heidelberg. Since 2006, he is full professor in the University of Osnabrück. Using yeast as model system, he is studying membrane dynamics in the endosomal system, with the focus on Rab GTPases and tethering complexes.


Corresponding authors: Joost C.M. Holthuis, Section of Molecular Cell Biology, Department of Biology/Chemistry, University of Osnabrück, Barbarastrasse 13, D-49076 Osnabrück, Germany; and Christian Ungermann, Section of Biochemistry, Department of Biology/Chemistry, University of Osnabrück, Barbarastrasse 13, D-49076 Osnabrück, Germany


Received: 2012-07-30

Accepted: 2012-09-28

Published Online: 2013-01-08

Published in Print: 2013-02-01


Citation Information: Biological Chemistry, Volume 394, Issue 2, Pages 151–161, ISSN (Online) 1437-4315, ISSN (Print) 1431-6730, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/hsz-2012-0265.

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