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The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy

Editor-in-Chief: Jürges, Hendrik / Ludwig, Sandra

Ed. by Auriol , Emmanuelle / Brunner, Johann / Fleck, Robert / Mendola, Mariapia / Requate, Till / Schirle, Tammy / de Vries, Frans / Zulehner, Christine

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IMPACT FACTOR 2016: 0.252
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1935-1682
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Volume 8, Issue 1 (Jun 2008)

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Volume 1 (2001)

The Causal Effect of Studying on Academic Performance

Ralph Stinebrickner
  • 1Berea College,
/ Todd R. Stinebrickner
  • 2University of Western Ontario,
Published Online: 2008-06-17 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2202/1935-1682.1868

Abstract

While a substantial amount of recent attention has been paid to understanding the determinants of educational outcomes, little is known about the causal impact of the most fundamental input in the education production function - a student's study effort. In this paper, we examine the causal effect of studying on grade performance by taking advantage of unique, new data that has been collected specifically for this purpose. Important for understanding the potential impact of a wide array of education policies, the results suggest that human capital accumulation is far from predetermined at the time of college entrance.

Keywords: college performance; grade point average determination; education production function; study effort; time-use; higher education; peer effects; video games

About the article

Published Online: 2008-06-17



Citation Information: The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, ISSN (Online) 1935-1682, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2202/1935-1682.1868. Export Citation

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