Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy

Editor-in-Chief: Jürges, Hendrik / Ludwig, Sandra

Ed. by Auriol, Emmanuelle / Brunner, Johann / Fleck, Robert / Mastrobuoni, Giovanni / Mendola, Mariapia / Requate, Till / de Vries, Frans / Zulehner, Christine

4 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 0.306
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 0.492

CiteScore 2017: 0.50

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.414
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.531

Online
ISSN
1935-1682
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 18, Issue 4

Issues

Volume 6 (2006)

Volume 4 (2004)

Volume 2 (2002)

Volume 1 (2001)

A Sibling-Pair Analysis for Causal Effect of Education on Health

Yu Bai / Yanjun LiORCID iD: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6650-5031
Published Online: 2018-08-17 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bejeap-2018-0121

Abstract

This paper examines the causal effect of education on long-run physical health, using survey data on matched siblings. By adopting a sibling-differences strategy, we are able to obtain estimates that are not biased by unobserved genetic factors and family background which affect both education and health. To address the potential endogenous shocks that affect siblings differently within the family, we further employ an instrumental variable approach by exploiting a profound disturbance in the education system during the Cultural Revolution in China. The within-sibling estimates suggest that an additional year of schooling is found to be positively related to health status later in life (better self-reported health, lower probability of feeling uncomfortable, getting chronic diseases, and being underweight). We also unravel the potential roles of income and cognition in the effects of education on health.

This article offers supplementary material which is provided at the end of the article.

Keywords: siblings; health outcomes; returns to schooling; the cultural revolution

JEL Classification: I12; I15; J14

References

  • Aaronson, D., and B. Mazumder. 2011. “The Impact of Rosenwald Schools on Black Achievement.” Journal of Political Economy 119 (5): 821–888.CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • Ashenfelter, O., and A. Krueger. 1994. “Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins.” American Economic Review 84 (5): 1157–1173.Google Scholar

  • Ashenfelter, O., and C. Rouse. 1998. “Income, Schooling and Ability: Evidence from a New Sample of Identical Twins.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 113 (1): 253–284.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Bound, J., and G. Solon. 1999. “Double Trouble: On the Value of Twin-Based Estimation of the Return to Schooling.” Economics of Education Review 18: 169–182.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Cutler, D. M., A. Lleras-Muney. 2010. “Understanding Differences in Health Behaviors by Education.” Journal of Health Economics 29 (1): 1–28.Web of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Lleras-Muney, A. 2005. “The Relationships Between Education and Adult Mortality in the United States.” Review of Economic Studies 1 (250): 189–221.Google Scholar

  • Lundborg, P. 2013. “The Health Returns to Schooling–What Can we Learn From Twins?” Journal of Population Economics 26: 673–701.CrossrefWeb of ScienceGoogle Scholar

  • Meng, X., and R.G. Gregory. 2002. “The Impact of Interrupted Education on Subsequent Educational Attainment: A Cost of the Chinese Cultural Revolution.” Economic Development and Cultural Change 50 (4): 935–959.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Oreopoulos, P. 2006. “Estimating Average and Local Average Treatment Effects of Education when Compulsory School Laws Really Matter.” American Economic Review 96 (1): 152–175.CrossrefGoogle Scholar

  • Wu, L.W. 2017. “The Invisible Wound: The long-term impact of China’s Cultural Revolution on trust.” Working Paper.Google Scholar

  • Xie, Y., Y. Jiang, and E. Greenman. 2008. “Did Send-Down Experience Benefit Youth? A Reevaluation of the Social Consequences of Forced Urban-Rural Migration During China’s Cultural Revolution.” Social Science Research 37 (2): 686–700.Web of ScienceCrossrefGoogle Scholar

About the article

Published Online: 2018-08-17


Citation Information: The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, Volume 18, Issue 4, 20180121, ISSN (Online) 1935-1682, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bejeap-2018-0121.

Export Citation

© 2018 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston.Get Permission

Supplementary Article Materials

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in