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Volume 64, Issue 3

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Soil carbon dioxide efflux determined from large undisturbed soil cores collected in different soil management systems

Eszter Tóth
  • Research Institute for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Herman O. u. 15, H-1022, Budapest, Hungary
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/ Sándor Koós
  • Research Institute for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Herman O. u. 15, H-1022, Budapest, Hungary
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/ Csilla Farkas
  • Research Institute for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Herman O. u. 15, H-1022, Budapest, Hungary
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Published Online: 2009-05-09 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/s11756-009-0111-x

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate a measuring technique for determining soil CO2 efflux from large soil samples having undisturbed structure under controlled laboratory conditions. Further objectives were to use the developed measuring method for comparing soil CO2 efflux from samples, collected in three different soil management systems at various soil water content values. The experimental technique was tested and optimised for timing of sampling by taking air samples after 1, 3 and 6 hours of incubation. Based on the results, the incubation time was set to three hours. The CO2 efflux measured for different soil management systems was the highest in the no-till and the lowest in the ploughing treatment, which was in accordance with measurements on accessible organic carbon for microbes. An increase in CO2 efflux with increasing soil water content was found in the studied soil water content range. Our results indicate that soil respiration rates, measured directly after tillage operations, can highly differ from those measured long after.

Keywords: CO2 emission; soil tillage; soil water content; undisturbed soil columns

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About the article

Published Online: 2009-05-09

Published in Print: 2009-06-01


Citation Information: Biologia, Volume 64, Issue 3, Pages 643–647, ISSN (Online) 1336-9563, ISSN (Print) 0006-3088, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/s11756-009-0111-x.

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© 2009 Slovak Academy of Sciences. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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