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Basic Income Studies

Ed. by Haagh, Anne-Louise / Howard, Michael


CiteScore 2018: 0.47

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.111
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1932-0183
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Caring Revolutionary Transformation: Combined Effects of a Universal Basic Income and a Public Model of Care

Zuzana Uhde
Published Online: 2018-12-13 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bis-2017-0019

Abstract

This paper explores the possibilities of the recognition and valuation of care by implementing an unconditional basic income (UBI) and presents a feminist redefinition of the concept of a UBI. The author proposes the notion of a caring revolutionary transformation as a process of institutionalising the social and economic conditions for recognition of care which is a cornerstone of struggles for women’s emancipation and gender equity. It is a process of practically realisable transformative steps which together with their combined and mutually reinforcing effects enable more radical social changes beyond a mere reform. The author argues that these transformative steps have to address two conditions embedded in the institutionalised structures of late modern capitalist society: the limited understanding of meaningful work as paid employment; and the liberal ideal of the independent and autonomous individual. Whereas a UBI can challenge the first condition, a public model of care questions the second condition by shifting the primary responsibility of care from the family towards a social solidarity. While insufficient when introduced separately, the combination of these two remedies has the potential to radically alter social structures on which gendered inequalities rest.

Keywords: unconditional basic income; gendered division of labour; revolutionary transformation; care

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About the article

Published Online: 2018-12-13


This work was supported by Funder Name: Czech Academy of Sciences, Grant Number: RVO: 68378025; Funder Name: Czech Science Foundation, Grant Number: P404-15-07898S.


Citation Information: Basic Income Studies, Volume 13, Issue 2, 20170019, ISSN (Online) 1932-0183, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bis-2017-0019.

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