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Basic Income Studies

Ed. by Haagh, Anne-Louise / Howard, Michael


CiteScore 2017: 0.70

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.209
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.448

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1932-0183
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Would a Basic Income Guarantee Reduce the Motivation to Work? An Analysis of Labor Responses in 16 Trial Programs

Richard Gilbert
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  • Psychology, Loyola Marymount University Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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/ Nora A. Murphy
  • Psychology, Loyola Marymount University Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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/ Allison Stepka
  • Psychology, Loyola Marymount University Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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/ Mark Barrett / Dianne Worku
  • Psychology and Economics, Loyola Marymount University Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts, Los Angeles, CA, USA
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Published Online: 2018-11-21 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bis-2018-0011

Abstract

Many opponents of BIG programs believe that receiving guaranteed subsistence income would act as a strong disincentive to work. In contrast, various areas of empirical research in psychology (studies of intrinsic motivation; non-pecuniary benefits of work on social identity and purpose; and reactions to financial windfalls such as lottery winnings) suggest that a BIG would not lead to meaningful reductions in work. To test these competing predictions, a comprehensive review of BIG outcome studies reporting data on adult labor responses was conducted. The results indicate that 93 % of reported outcomes support the prediction of no meaningful work reductions when the criterion for support is set at less than a 5 % decrease in either average hours worked per week or the rate of labor participation. Overall, these results indicate that adult labor responses would show no substantial impact following a BIG intervention.

Keywords: basic income; basic income guarantee; labor outcomes; evaluation studies; pilot programs

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Published Online: 2018-11-21


Citation Information: Basic Income Studies, Volume 13, Issue 2, 20180011, ISSN (Online) 1932-0183, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bis-2018-0011.

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