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Biomolecular Concepts

Editor-in-Chief: Di Cera, Enrico


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CiteScore 2018: 3.35

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.475
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.825

ICV 2018: 124.31

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1868-503X
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Volume 1, Issue 1

Issues

The Musashi family RNA-binding proteins in stem cells

Kenichi Horisawa
  • Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Takao Imai
  • Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
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/ Hideyuki Okano
  • Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
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/ Hiroshi Yanagawa
  • Department of Biosciences and Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2010-03-26 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc.2010.005

Abstract

The Musashi family is an evolutionarily conserved group of RNA-binding proteins. In mammal, two members of the group, Msi1 and Msi2, have been identified to date. Msi1 is considered to play roles in maintaining the stem cell status (stemness) of neural stem/progenitor cells in adults and in the development of central nervous system through translational regulation of its target mRNAs, which encode regulators of signal transduction and the cell cycle. Recently, strong expression of Msi1 in various somatic stem/progenitor cells of adult tissues, such as eye, gut, stomach, breast, and hair follicle, has been reported. The protein is also expressed in various cancer cells, and ectopically emerging cells have been found in neural tissues of patients with diseases involving neural disorder, including epilepsy. Many novel target mRNAs and regulatory pathways of Msi1 have been reported in recent years. Here, we present a review of the functions and action mechanisms of Msi1 protein and discuss possible directions for further study.

Keywords: Musashi; post-transcriptional regulation; progenitor cell; RNA-binding protein; stem cell

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Published Online: 2010-03-26

Published in Print: 2010-05-01


Citation Information: BioMolecular Concepts, Volume 1, Issue 1, Pages 59–66, ISSN (Online) 1868-503X, ISSN (Print) 1868-5021, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc.2010.005.

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