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Biomolecular Concepts

Editor-in-Chief: Di Cera, Enrico


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1868-503X
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Volume 3, Issue 4

Issues

Small GTPase Ran and Ran-binding proteins

Masahiro Nagai
  • Biomolecular Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Frontier Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Yoshihiro Yoneda
  • Corresponding author
  • Biomolecular Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Frontier Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
  • Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
  • Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Osaka University, 1-3 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan
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  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-05-16 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc-2011-0068

Abstract

Like many other small GTPases, Ran functions in eukaryotic cells as a molecular switch that cycles between GTP- and GDP-bound forms. Through the proper modulation of the GTP/GDP cycle, Ran functions with a number of Ran-binding proteins to control a broad array of fundamental cellular functions, including nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly, and nuclear envelope and nuclear pore complex formation. Recent studies have revealed that ‘Ran and Ran binding proteins’ are involved in a variety of functions involving cell fate determination, including cell death, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and malignant transformation. In this review, we discuss recent progress on the functional link between the Ran system and tumorigenesis, which give clues to the molecular understanding of cancer biology.

Keywords: cancer; cell fate determination; importin β; nucleocytoplasmic transport; Ran

About the article

Masahiro Nagai

Masahiro Nagai graduated from the Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, and obtained his Master’s degree at the Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University. Having started investigating Ran and Ran-binding proteins at Prof. Yoneda’s laboratory, he completed his PhD studies at the Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, in 2011. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, and is studying the physiological signifi cance of Ran and Ran-binding proteins.

Yoshihiro Yoneda

Yoshihiro Yoneda is a professor at the Laboratory of Biomolecular Networks, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, and at the Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University (1981) and received his PhD at the Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University (1985), followed by postdoctoral training at the Institute for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Osaka University. He has headed a research group since 1992. His current research interests are ‘nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins’, ‘nuclear organization and dynamics’, ‘cell differentiation and cell reprogramming’ and ‘cell stress response and nuclear transport’.


Corresponding author


Received: 2011-12-29

Accepted: 2012-04-10

Published Online: 2012-05-16

Published in Print: 2012-08-01


Citation Information: BioMolecular Concepts, Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 307–318, ISSN (Online) 1868-503X, ISSN (Print) 1868-5021, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc-2011-0068.

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