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Biomolecular Concepts

Editor-in-Chief: Di Cera, Enrico


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CiteScore 2018: 3.35

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.475
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.825

ICV 2017: 131.30

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Online
ISSN
1868-503X
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Volume 3, Issue 4

Issues

Genomic and non-genomic actions of estrogen: recent developments

Kotaro Azuma
  • Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Satoshi Inoue
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
  • Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655, Japan
  • Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical School, Saitama 350-1241, Japan
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2012-03-25 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc-2012-0002

Abstract

Estrogen affects transcriptional status by activating its corresponding nuclear receptor, the estrogen receptor (ER). It can also induce rapid cellular reactions within a few minutes, and this feature cannot be explained by the transcription-mediated effects of estrogen. The latter mechanisms are called ‘non-genomic actions’ of estrogen. In contrast, the former classic modes of action came to be called ‘genomic actions’. One of the recent developments of research on estrogen was the substantiation of the non-genomic actions of estrogen; these were initially observed and reported as intriguing phenomena more than 40 years ago. The interacting molecules as well as the biological significance of non-genomic actions have now been shown. In the field of genomic actions, invention and spread of new technologies, including high-throughput sequencers, promoted a comprehensive view of estrogen-mediated transcriptional regulation.

Keywords: estrogen; estrogen receptor; genomic action; non-genomic action

About the article

Kotaro Azuma

Kotaro Azuma, 1999: MD, Physician, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 2002–2005: Research Resident, Growth Factor Division, National Cancer, Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan. 2008–present: Assistant Professor, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Satoshi Inoue

Satoshi Inoue, 1985–1992: MD, Physician, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. 1993–2002 Assistant Professor, Department of Geriatrics, University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (1995–1998 Research Associate, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA). 2002–present: Head and Visiting Professor, Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan. 2006–present: Professor, Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.


Corresponding author


Received: 2012-01-29

Accepted: 2012-02-27

Published Online: 2012-03-25

Published in Print: 2012-08-01


Citation Information: BioMolecular Concepts, Volume 3, Issue 4, Pages 365–370, ISSN (Online) 1868-503X, ISSN (Print) 1868-5021, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc-2012-0002.

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©2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston.Get Permission

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