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Biomolecular Concepts

Editor-in-Chief: Jollès, Pierre / Mansuy, Isabelle

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Y RNAs: recent developments

Adam E. Hall
  • School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
  • These authors contributed equally to this work.
/ Carly Turnbull
  • School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
  • These authors contributed equally to this work.
/ Tamas Dalmay
  • Corresponding author
  • School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
  • Email:
Published Online: 2013-01-16 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc-2012-0050

Abstract

Non-coding RNAs have emerged as key regulators in diverse cellular processes. Y RNAs are ∼100-nucleotide-long non-coding RNAs that show high conservation in metazoans. Human Y RNAs are known to bind to the Ro60 and La proteins to form the Ro ribonucleoprotein complex. Their main biological function appears to be in mediating the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication, regulating the autoimmune protein Ro60, and generating smaller RNA fragments following cellular stress, although the precise molecular mechanisms underlying these functions remain elusive. Here, we aim to review the most recent literature on Y RNAs and gain insight into the function of these intriguing molecules.

Keywords: DNA replication; Ro60; small non-coding RNA; Y RNA

About the article

Adam E. Hall

Adam E. Hall studied Biological Sciences at the University of Birmingham and later went on to specialise in Molecular Genetics at the University of Leicester for his master’s degree. He then moved to Norwich for his PhD to work on small non-coding RNAs. Specifically, he has been investigating microRNAs and Y RNAs in animal cells.

Carly Turnbull

Carly Turnbull studied for a BSc in Genetics at the University of Leicester before working for the NHS West Midlands Regional Genetics Service. Prior to her PhD, she undertook research assistant positions at the MRC/CSC Genomics Laboratory in London and at the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford. She is now in her fourth year of a PhD focusing on the cleavage of human Y RNAs.

Tamas Dalmay

Tamas Dalmay graduated in Budapest and obtained his PhD from the Hungarian Academy of Science. He moved to The Sainsbury Laboratory in 1995 where he worked on the genetics of gene silencing in plants with Prof. David Baulcombe. He established his group in 2002 at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. His group focuses on the biology of small regulatory RNAs in plants and animals.


Corresponding author: Tamas Dalmay, School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK


Received: 2012-11-14

Accepted: 2012-12-05

Published Online: 2013-01-16

Published in Print: 2013-04-01



Citation Information: BioMolecular Concepts, ISSN (Online) 1868-503X, ISSN (Print) 1868-5021, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmc-2012-0050. Export Citation

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