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Biomedical Engineering / Biomedizinische Technik

Editor-in-Chief: Dössel, Olaf

Editorial Board Member: Augat, Peter / Haueisen, Jens / Jockenhoevel, Stefan / Lenarz, Thomas / Leonhardt, Steffen / Plank, Gernot / Radermacher, Klaus M. / Schkommodau, Erik / Schmitz, Georg / Stieglitz, Thomas / Witte, Herbert / Boenick, Ulrich / Jaramaz, Branislav / Kraft, Marc / Lenthe, Harry / Lo, Benny / Mainardi, Luca / Micera, Silvestro / Penzel, Thomas / Robitzki, Andrea A. / Schaeffter, Tobias / Snedeker, Jess G. / Sörnmo, Leif / Sugano, Nobuhiko / Werner, Jürgen / Wintermantel, Erich /

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Volume 57 (2012)

Kinetic energy scavenging in a prosthetic foot using a fluidic system

Christian Pylatiuk
  • Institute for Applied Computer Science (IAI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
  • :
/ Fabian Metzger
  • Institute for Applied Computer Science (IAI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
/ Roland Wiegand
  • Institute for Applied Computer Science (IAI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
/ Georg Bretthauer
  • Institute for Applied Computer Science (IAI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany
Published Online: 2013-08-03 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmt-2012-0092

Abstract

The use of active prostheses for the lower extremity is limited by the amount of electric energy stored in batteries. A promising way to extend their usage time is to convert motions generated by the human body during walking to electrical energy. A first functioning prototype was designed to transfer kinetic energy from heel contact and forefoot contact to a generator by using a fluidic system. Experimental results show that walking with the system generates an average electrical power of 0.8 W. The design of the energy scavenging system (ESS) is presented and results are discussed.

Keywords: biomechanics; body energy harvesting; fluidic system; foot prosthesis

Corresponding author: Christian Pylatiuk, Institute for Applied Computer Science (IAI), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany, Phone: +49-721-608-22430, Fax: +49-721-608-25786


Received: 2012-10-18

Accepted: 2013-07-15

Published Online: 2013-08-03

Published in Print: 2013-08-01


Citation Information: Biomedizinische Technik/Biomedical Engineering. Volume 58, Issue 4, Pages 353–358, ISSN (Online) 1862-278X, ISSN (Print) 0013-5585, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmt-2012-0092, August 2013

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