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Biomedical Engineering / Biomedizinische Technik

Joint Journal of the German Society for Biomedical Engineering in VDE and the Austrian and Swiss Societies for Biomedical Engineering and the German Society of Biomaterials

Editor-in-Chief: Dössel, Olaf

Editorial Board: Augat, Peter / Habibović, Pamela / Haueisen, Jens / Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm / Jockenhoevel, Stefan / Knaup-Gregori, Petra / Lenarz, Thomas / Leonhardt, Steffen / Plank, Gernot / Radermacher, Klaus M. / Schkommodau, Erik / Stieglitz, Thomas / Boenick, Ulrich / Jaramaz, Branislav / Kraft, Marc / Lenthe, Harry / Lo, Benny / Mainardi, Luca / Micera, Silvestro / Penzel, Thomas / Robitzki, Andrea A. / Schaeffter, Tobias / Snedeker, Jess G. / Sörnmo, Leif / Sugano, Nobuhiko / Werner, Jürgen /

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1862-278X
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Volume 63, Issue 6

Issues

Volume 57 (2012)

Pupillographic campimetry: an objective method to measure the visual field

Krunoslav Stingl
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Tobias Peters
  • Corresponding author
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Torsten Strasser
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Institute for Ophthalmic Research, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Carina Kelbsch
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
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  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Paul Richter
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Helmut Wilhelm
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Barbara Wilhelm
  • Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2018-01-24 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmt-2017-0029

Abstract

Pupillographic campimetry allows measuring the visual field objectively by analyzing the pupil response to perimetric stimuli. One of the drawbacks of this technique, similar to static perimetry, is the need of reliable fixation of the subject. By using stimulus sizes comparable to static perimetry and applying gaze tracking, we enable a retinotopic visual field examination regardless of fixation problems and with an increased stability and improved spatial resolution. Here, we present the results of applying the method in eight normal sighted subjects as well as in three patients suffering from diseases usually diagnosed by perimetry. The results in normal sighted subjects show a reduction in the amplitude of the pupil response with increasing eccentricity as expected. We also demonstrate that gaze-controlled campimetry is able to detect organic visual field defects objectively in a patient group and classify the visual field defects without an organic background. Moreover, we show that our method is able to evaluate the visual field sensitivity loss beyond classical perimetry in patients with late-stage retinitis pigmentosa. Thus, gaze-controlled pupil campimetry can be used in addition to classical perimetry, allowing for an objective monitoring of disease progression, rendering it as a biomarker for novel treatments.

Keywords: campimetry; gaze tracking; pupil light reflex; pupillography; visual field

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About the article

Corresponding author: Dr. med. Tobias Peters, Pupil Research Group at the Centre for Ophthalmology, University of Tübingen, Elfriede-Aulhorn-Str. 7, 72076 Tübingen, Germany, Tel.: 07071 298 4894, Fax: 07071 29 5021


Received: 2017-03-19

Accepted: 2017-06-21

Published Online: 2018-01-24

Published in Print: 2018-11-27


Citation Information: Biomedical Engineering / Biomedizinische Technik, Volume 63, Issue 6, Pages 729–734, ISSN (Online) 1862-278X, ISSN (Print) 0013-5585, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bmt-2017-0029.

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