Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Botanica Marina

Editor-in-Chief: Dring, Matthew J.

6 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 0.989
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.204

CiteScore 2017: 1.00

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 0.297
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 0.454

Online
ISSN
1437-4323
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Just Accepted

Issues

Susceptibility of macroalgae to herbivorous fishes at Rocas Atoll, Brazil

Leonardo Vidal Marques
  • Pós-Graduação em Biologia Marinha, Departamento de Biologia Marinha, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O. Box 100.644, CEP 24001-970, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Roberto Villaça
  • Pós-Graduação em Biologia Marinha, Departamento de Biologia Marinha, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O. Box 100.644, CEP 24001-970, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Renato Crespo Pereira
  • Pós-Graduação em Biologia Marinha, Departamento de Biologia Marinha, Universidade Federal Fluminense, P.O. Box 100.644, CEP 24001-970, Niterói, RJ, Brazil
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2006-12-07 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BOT.2006.049

Abstract

Although herbivory by fishes is recognized as a fundamental process structuring coral reef communities, the susceptibility of macroalgae and potential effects of this process at Rocas Atoll are unknown. Macroalgal consumption was evaluated through field transplant assays onto reef sites to investigate the differential susceptibility of species to herbivory by fishes. Of 13 species examined, the red macroalga Digenea simplex was highly preferred and probably constitutes the most important food resource to herbivorous fishes in almost all parts of the atoll. The green macroalga Bryopsis plumosa and the brown algae Dictyopteris jamaicensis, Dictyota crispata, D. ciliolata, D. cervicornis, D. menstrualis, D. mertensii, D. pfaffii and D. pinnatifida were less preferred, probably due to chemical defenses, since all are known to produce secondary metabolites, many of which are broad spectrum feeding deterrents against herbivores including reef fishes. Finally, the algae Sargassum polyceratium and Gelidiella acerosa were less preferred, probably because of both morphological features and chemical defenses. This differential susceptibility of the seaweeds to herbivory associated with different spatial herbivory pressure may be responsible for the variable distribution and abundance of seaweeds around the Rocas Atoll reef.

Keywords: fishes; herbivory; Rocas Atoll; seaweeds

About the article

Corresponding author


Received: March 24, 2006

Accepted: September 12, 2006

Published Online: 2006-12-07

Published in Print: 2006-12-01


Citation Information: Botanica Marina, Volume 49, Issue 5/6, Pages 379–385, ISSN (Online) 1437-4323, ISSN (Print) 0006-8055, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/BOT.2006.049.

Export Citation

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Adriana C. Fonseca, Roberto Villaça, and Bastiaan Knoppers
Journal of Marine Biology, 2012, Volume 2012, Page 1
[2]
Roberto Villaça, Adriana Carvalhal Fonseca, Viviane Köppe Jensen, and Bastiaan Knoppers
Botanica Marina, 2010, Volume 53, Number 2
[3]
Andrew S. Hoey and David R. Bellwood
Marine Biology, 2010, Volume 157, Number 1, Page 189
[4]
Valerie J. Paul and Raphael Ritson-Williams
Natural Product Reports, 2008, Volume 25, Number 4, Page 662

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in