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Botanica Marina

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Volume 55, Issue 6

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Factors associated with moderate blooms of Pyrodinium bahamense in shallow and restricted subtropical lagoons in the Gulf of California

Lourdes Morquecho
  • Corresponding author
  • Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Instituto Politécnico Nacional 195, Col. Playa Palo de Santa Rita, La Paz, B.C.S. 23096, México
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/ Rosalba Alonso-Rodríguez
  • Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Académica Mazatlán, Apdo. Postal 811, Mazatlán, Sinaloa 82040, México
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/ José A. Arreola-Lizárraga
  • Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Unidad Guaymas, Carr. a Las Tinajas Predio El Tular s/n, Guaymas, Sonora 85454, México
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/ Amada Reyes-Salinas
  • Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Instituto Politécnico Nacional 195, Col. Playa Palo de Santa Rita, La Paz, B.C.S. 23096, México
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Published Online: 2012-10-18 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bot-2012-0171

Abstract

We examined the environmental and biological factors related to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense in three shallow, restricted subtropical lagoons in the Gulf of California during the rainy summer. In the San José, Yavaros, and El Colorado lagoons, the vegetative stage peaked at 63, 108, and 151 (×103 cells l-1), respectively. At San José, production of cysts peaked at 9.7×103 g-1 of dry sediment mass as the bloom declined. Large diatoms predominated, with P. bahamense the most common dinoflagellate during the blooms. Abundance of P. bahamense at San José was positively correlated with salinity (r=0.50, p=0.0003), seawater temperature (r=0.44, p=0.005), silicates (r=0.45, p=0.003), and ammonium (r=0.32, p=0.005), and negatively correlated with dissolved oxygen (r=-0.34, p<0.0001). No such correlations were found at El Colorado and Yavaros. The environmental window that favors development of blooms is restricted to the summer and is influenced by seawater temperature, salinity, and relative concentrations of ammonium and phosphates that, in turn, depend on rainfall and runoff, which is greater on the eastern side of the Gulf where seawater quality is degraded.

Keywords: bloom dynamics; cysts; ecology; Gulf of California; Mexico; Pyrodinium bahamense; subtropical lagoons

About the article

Corresponding author: Lourdes Morquecho, Centro de ­Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR), Instituto ­Politécnico Nacional 195, Col. Playa Palo de Santa Rita, La Paz, B.C.S. 23096, México


Received: 2012-06-17

Accepted: 2012-09-20

Published Online: 2012-10-18

Published in Print: 2012-12-01


Citation Information: Botanica Marina, Volume 55, Issue 6, Pages 611–623, ISSN (Online) 1437-4323, ISSN (Print) 0006-8055, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bot-2012-0171.

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©2012 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin Boston.Get Permission

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