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Bulletin of the Veterinary Institute in Pulawy

The Journal of National Veterinary Research Institute in Pulawy

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2300-3235
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Improvement of Large Animal Model for Studying Osteoporosis

Zdzisław Kiełbowicz
  • Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Wroclaw, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland
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/ Anita Piątek
  • Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Wroclaw, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland
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/ Janusz Bieżyński
  • Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Wroclaw, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland
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/ Piotr Skrzypczak
  • Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Wroclaw, 50-366 Wroclaw, Poland
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/ Ewa Chmielewska
  • Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland
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/ Paweł Kafarski
  • Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University of Technology, 50-370 Wroclaw, Poland
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/ Jan Kuryszko
  • Department of Biostructure and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Environmental and Life Sciences in Wroclaw, 50-375 Wroclaw, Poland
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Published Online: 2015-04-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bvip-2015-0018

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the impact of steroidal medications on the structure and mechanical properties of supporting tissues of sheep under experimentally-induced osteoporosis. A total of 21 sheep were used, divided into three groups: a negative control (KN) (n = 3), a positive control (KP) (n = 3) with ovariectomy, and a steroidal group (KS) (n = 15) with ovariectomy and glucocorticosteroids. All animals were kept on a low protein and mineral diet and had limited physical activity and access to sunlight. Quantitative computed tomography was the examination method. The declines in the examined parameter values in the KS group were more than three times higher than in the KN group. The study suggests that a glucocorticosteroidal therapy accelerates and intensifies processes taking place in the course of osteoporosis. The combination of glucocorticosteroids with ovariectomy, a restrictive diet, limited physical activity, and no access to sunlight leads to a decrease in radiological bone density.

Key words:: sheep; osteoporosis; large animal model; glicocorticosteroids

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About the article

Received: 2014-07-29

Accepted: 2015-02-24

Published Online: 2015-04-01


Citation Information: Bulletin of the Veterinary Institute in Pulawy, Volume 59, Issue 1, Pages 123–128, ISSN (Online) 2300-3235, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/bvip-2015-0018.

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© 2015 National Veterinary Research Institute in Pulawy. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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