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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter / Tate, Jillian R.

12 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2016: 3.432

CiteScore 2016: 2.21

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 1.000
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 1.112

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ISSN
1437-4331
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Volume 41, Issue 11 (Nov 2003)

Issues

Holotranscobalamin as a Predictor of Vitamin B12 Status

Anne-Mette Hvas / Ebba Nexo
Published Online: 2005-06-01 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2003.228

Abstract

We report on the performance of a new test, holotranscobalamin, as compared to well established markers of vitamin B12 deficiency (plasma cobalamins, methylmalonic acid, and homocysteine). Holotranscobalamin was analyzed in 143 samples by a competitive radiobinding assay (Axis-Shield). Employing a cut-off value of 50 pmol/l, holotranscobalamin showed a sensitivity of 1.00 and a specificity of 0.89 as regards discriminating between individuals with test results indicating vitamin B12 deficiency (methylmalonic acid >0.70 μmol/l and plasma cobalamins <200 pmol/l, n = 35) and individuals with test results inside the reference intervals (methylmalonic acid <0.29 μmol/l and plasma cobalamins ≥200 pmol/l, n = 35). In a group (n = 37) with low plasma cobalamins (<200 pmol/l) and normal methylmalonic acid (<0.29 μmol/l), 27 individuals had low holotranscobalamin, and in nine of these individuals plasma homocysteine supported the deficiency state (homocysteine >15 μmol/l). Holotranscobalamin was low in 12 individuals with increased methylmalonic acid (>0.40 μmol/l) and normal plasma cobalamins ≥200 pmol/l) (n = 36), and plasma homocysteine supported the deficiency state in four of these individuals. We conclude that holotranscobalamin is likely to be a sensitive marker of vitamin B12 deficiency that also has a reasonable specificity. Large-scale clinical studies are warranted in order to clarify the usefulness of holotranscobalamin in the clinical setting.

About the article

Published Online: 2005-06-01

Published in Print: 2003-11-17


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2003.228.

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