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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter / Tate, Jillian R.


IMPACT FACTOR increased in 2015: 3.017
Rank 5 out of 30 in category Medical Laboratory Technology in the 2014 Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Report/Science Edition

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2015: 0.873
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2015: 0.982
Impact per Publication (IPP) 2015: 2.238

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1437-4331
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Homocysteine, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cognitive performance: The Maine-Syracuse Study

Michael A. Robbins1 / Merrill F. Elias2 / Marc M. Budge3 / Suzanne L. Brennan4 / Penelope K. Elias5

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Corresponding author: Michael A. Robbins, PhD, Department of Psychology, 5742 Little Hall, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469-5742, USA Phone: +1-207-581-2051, Fax: +1-207-581-6128,

Citation Information: Clinical Chemical Laboratory Medicine. Volume 43, Issue 10, Pages 1101–1106, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2005.192, October 2005

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus and higher total plasma homocysteine concentrations are each associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and with diminished cognitive performance. Relations between homocysteine concentrations and cardiovascular disease incidence are stronger in the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, we hypothesized that relations between homocysteine concentrations and cognitive performance would be stronger in the presence of type 2 diabetes. We related homocysteine concentrations and cognitive performance on the Mini-Mental State Examination in 817 dementia- and stroke-free participants of the Maine-Syracuse Study, 90 of whom were classified with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Regardless of statistical adjustment for age, sex, gender, vitamin co-factors (folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12), cardiovascular disease risk factors, and duration and type of treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, statistically significant inverse associations between homocysteine concentrations and cognitive performance were observed for diabetic individuals. The weaker inverse associations between homocysteine concentrations and cognitive performance obtained for non-diabetic individuals were not robust to statistical adjustment for some covariates. Interactions between homocysteine concentrations and type 2 diabetes mellitus are observed such that associations between homocysteine and cognitive performance are stronger in the presence of diabetes.

Keywords: cardiovascular risk factors; cognitive performance; diabetes mellitus; folate; homocysteine; vitamin B12; vitamin B6

Citing Articles

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[1]
Miaoyan Zheng, Meilin Zhang, Juhong Yang, Shijing Zhao, Shanchun Qin, Hui Chen, Yuxia Gao, and Guowei Huang
Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition, 2014, Volume 54, Number 2, Page 122
[2]
Roger M. Lane and Yunsheng He
Alzheimer's & Dementia, 2013, Volume 9, Number 2, Page e17
[3]
Gregory A. Dore, Merrill F. Elias, Michael A. Robbins, Penelope K. Elias, and Suzanne L. Brennan
Experimental Aging Research, 2007, Volume 33, Number 3, Page 205
[4]
Nicole M. Gatto, Victor W. Henderson, Jan A. St. John, Carol McCleary, Howard N. Hodis, and Wendy J. Mack
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition, 2008, Volume 15, Number 5, Page 627
[5]
Wolfgang Herrmann
Clinical Chemical Laboratory Medicine, 2005, Volume 43, Number 10
[6]
Nicole M. Gatto, Victor W. Henderson, Jan A. St. John, Carol McCleary, Robert Detrano, Howard N. Hodis, and Wendy J. Mack
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2009, Volume 24, Number 4, Page 390
[7]
Ralf-Joachim Schulz
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, 2007, Volume 10, Number 6, Page 718
[8]
Gregory A. Dore, Merrill F. Elias, Michael A. Robbins, Marc M. Budge, and Penelope K. Elias
Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2008, Volume 35, Number 3, Page 341
[9]
Jean-Sébastien Vidal, Carole Dufouil, Véronique Ducros, and Christophe Tzourio
Neuroepidemiology, 2008, Volume 30, Number 4, Page 207

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