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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter / Tate, Jillian R.

12 Issues per year


IMPACT FACTOR 2016: 3.432

CiteScore 2016: 2.21

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 1.000
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 1.112

Online
ISSN
1437-4331
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Volume 46, Issue 10 (Oct 2008)

Issues

Use of biochemical markers of bone turnover in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis

Pauline M. Camacho
  • 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA
/ Norma A. Lopez
  • 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL, USA

Abstract

Background: We currently have guidelines that allow us to use bone densitometry in the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. The role of biochemical markers of bone turnover (BTMs) is less well defined. Serum and urine BTM patterns in treated and untreated osteoporotic patients have been studied to help us define their role. The aim of this review is to present data which helps elucidate the current role and limitation of BTMs in the management of osteoporosis.

Method: A search of the literature on BTMs was performed. References with keywords, such as bone turnover markers, biochemical markers, monitoring therapy and monitoring osteoporosis, were used.

Results: Literature describing the nature and limitation of currently available BTMs was reviewed. The clinical use and limitation of BTMs in assessing fracture risk reduction, bone mineral density (BMD) and response to therapy is available, whereas definitive guidelines have not yet been created.

Conclusions: BTMs offer a potential non-invasive and reliable way of assessing skeletal activity, studying drug effects and response to therapies, assessing fracture risk and predicting other skeletal parameters, such as bone loss, BMD and bone mass. A 30%–70% reduction in bone resorption markers can be achieved with antiresorptive therapy, and 30%–50% increase in bone formation markers with anabolic therapy. We recommend that clinicians understand and incorporate the measurement of BTMs in the management of osteoporosis.

Clin Chem Lab Med 2008;46:1345–57.

Keywords: biochemical markers; bone markers; bone turnover markers; monitoring therapy; osteoporosis

About the article

Corresponding author: Pauline Camacho, Loyola University Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Disease Center, Maywood, IL 60153, USA


Received: 2008-02-15

Accepted: 2008-07-15

Published in Print: 2008-10-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2008.310.

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©2008 by Walter de Gruyter Berlin New York. Copyright Clearance Center

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