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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Greaves, Ronda / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 3.638

CiteScore 2018: 2.44

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.191
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 1.205

Online
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1437-4331
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Volume 46, Issue 6

Issues

Correction of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples for blood content does not increase sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CSF infection

Klas Boeer
  • 1Institut für Klinische Chemie und Laboratoriumsdiagnostik, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Robert Siegmund
  • 2Institut für Klinische Chemie und Laboratoriumsdiagnostik, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
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/ Wolfgang Pfister / Stefan Isenmann
  • 4Klinik für Neurologie und Klinische Neurophysiologie, Helios Klinkum Wuppertal und Universität Witten/Herdecke, Germany and Klinik für Neurologie, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
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/ Thomas Deufel
  • 5Institut für Klinische Chemie und Laboratoriumsdiagnostik, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
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Abstract

Background: Blood contamination is commonly observed in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with extraventricular drainage systems. Because the introduction of blood may interfere with the white blood cell count as a useful marker for the diagnosis of an infection, correction for blood content would be desirable.

Methods: In a retrospective study, we analysed the use of correction formulas in 724 blood-contaminated ventricular CSF samples.

Results: Using a standard correction method the white blood cell count was not normalised in most CSF samples, with pleocytosis indicating an inflammatory stimulus set by the blood itself or by the foreign body. When correcting white blood cell counts in the CSF of culture-positive patients, some samples were normalised or overcorrected. In addition, correction of the CSF white blood cell count did not increase sensitivity and specificity for the detection of culture-positive CSF samples.

Conclusions: Correction is not necessary when using the white blood cell count as a parameter to predict CSF infection in ventricular CSF samples.

Clin Chem Lab Med 2008;46:842–8.

Keywords: blood contamination; cerebrospinal fluid; correction; infection

About the article

Corresponding author: Dr. Klas Boeer, Institut für Klinische Chemie und Laboratoriumsdiagnostik, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena, Germany


Received: 2007-10-15

Accepted: 2008-02-14

Published in Print: 2008-06-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Volume 46, Issue 6, Pages 842–848, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2008.167.

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Citing Articles

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[1]
Giuseppe Enrico Bignardi
Journal of Clinical Pathology, 2015, Volume 68, Number 11, Page 870
[2]
Klas Boer, Thomas Deufel, and Mike Reinhoefer
Clinical Biochemistry, 2009, Volume 42, Number 7-8, Page 684
[3]
Klas Boeer, Heinz Vogelsang, Thomas Deufel, Wolfgang Pfister, and Michael Kiehntopf
Acta Neurochirurgica, 2011, Volume 153, Number 9, Page 1797

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