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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Greaves, Ronda / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 3.556

CiteScore 2017: 2.34

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 1.114
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 1.188

Online
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1437-4331
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Volume 48, Issue 6

Issues

Evaluation of a panel of circulating DNA, RNA and protein potential markers for pathologies of pregnancy

Silvia Galbiati
  • Genomic Unit for the Diagnosis of Human Pathologies, Center for Genomics, Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Vincenza Causarano
  • Genomic Unit for the Diagnosis of Human Pathologies, Center for Genomics, Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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/ Pamela Pinzani
  • Clinical Biochemistry Unit, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
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/ Salvianti Francesca
  • Clinical Biochemistry Unit, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
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/ Claudio Orlando
  • Clinical Biochemistry Unit, Department of Clinical Physiopathology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy
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/ Maddalena Smid / Federica Pasi / Maria T. Castiglioni / Paolo Cavoretto / Patrizia Rovere-Querini
  • Unit of Innate Immunity and Tissue Regeneration, Division of Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells and Gene Therapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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/ Silvia Pedroni
  • Genomic Unit for the Diagnosis of Human Pathologies, Center for Genomics, Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
  • Present address: Tommy's Center for Maternal and Fetal Health, Center for Reproductive Biology, Queen's Medical Research Institute, Edinburgh, UK.
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/ Stefano Calza / Maurizio Ferrari
  • Genomic Unit for the Diagnosis of Human Pathologies, Center for Genomics, Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
  • Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy
  • Diagnostica e Ricerca San Raffaele SpA, Milan, Italy
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/ Laura Cremonesi
  • Genomic Unit for the Diagnosis of Human Pathologies, Center for Genomics, Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy
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Published Online: 2010-04-08 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2010.160

Abstract

Background: Among markers of pregnancy complications, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA, long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) protein and fetal and total DNA had been reported to be increased in the plasma of women with overt preeclampsia (PE). We developed an optimized protocol to evaluate whether concentrations of CRH mRNA, PTX3 mRNA and protein, fetal and/or total DNA are increased in fetal growth restriction (FGR), and whether they predict complications of pregnancy.

Methods: The protocol included a preamplification step to enrich rare mRNA species. CRH and PTX3 mRNA, DNA and PTX3 protein were measured in the plasma of women with PE or FGR, in women at risk of developing these pathologies and in healthy women matched for gestational age.

Results: CRH mRNA, fetal and/or total DNA and PTX3 protein were significantly increased in women with overt PE when compared to controls. Pregnant women who later developed PE or FGR during pregnancy showed total DNA levels that were significantly increased before the onset of both pathologies, while RNA markers were increased only in women who later developed PE.

Conclusions: Our protocol for plasma RNA quantification may allow for the extension of a panel of predictive markers to be investigated in larger patient cohorts.

Clin Chem Lab Med 2010;48:791–4.

Keywords: fetal growth restriction; plasma markers; preeclampsia

About the article

Corresponding author: Laura Cremonesi, Genomic Unit for the Diagnosis of Human Pathologies, Center for Genomics, Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan, Italy Phone: +39 02 26434779, Fax: +39 02 26434351,


Received: 2009-11-09

Accepted: 2010-01-26

Published Online: 2010-04-08

Published in Print: 2010-06-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Volume 48, Issue 6, Pages 791–794, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2010.160.

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