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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Greaves, Ronda / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 3.638

CiteScore 2018: 2.44

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 1.191
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 1.205

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1437-4331
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Volume 51, Issue 4

Issues

Urinary iodine concentrations of pregnant women in Ukraine

Yui Sekitani
  • Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Naomi Hayashida
  • Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Jumpei Takahashi / Alexander A. Kozlovsky / Stanislav Rudnitskiy / Anjelika Petrova / Oleksandr K. Gutevych / Sergiy A. Chorniy / Shunichi Yamashita
  • Department of Radiation Medical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan
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/ Noboru Takamura
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan
  • Email
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Published Online: 2012-09-18 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2012-0397

Abstract

Background: Iodine requirements increase during pregnancy and previous studies have reported the inadequate iodine status of pregnant women in areas that have achieved iodine sufficiency in the general population. We examined the urinary iodine (UI) concentrations of pregnant women in Ukraine, where the iodine status is showing improvement among the general population.

Methods: We enrolled 148 pregnant women <16 weeks pregnant and 80 healthy women as a control group living in Zhitomir, Ukraine. UI concentration, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), antithyroglobulin antibodies (TGAb), and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) were measured.

Results: The median UI concentrations were significantly lower in pregnant women than in control women [13.0 (ND–51.0) μg/L vs. 62.0 (35.3–108.5) μg/L, p<0.001]. TSH concentrations were significantly lower in pregnant women than in control women [1.7 (1.2–2.7) IU/L vs. 2.2 (1.4–3.1) IU/L, p=0.011], but this difference disappeared when adjusted for age (2.1±0.1 IU/L vs. 2.4±0.2 IU/L, p=0.097). The frequency of TSH over 6.2 IU/L and the frequency of positive TGAb and/or TPOAb were not statistically different between groups (p=0.70 and p=0.48, respectively). The UI concentrations of 142 pregnant women (95.9%) were <150 μg/L indicating insufficient iodine intake.

Conclusions: The UI concentration of pregnant women in Ukraine revealed severe iodine deficiency. Regular monitoring and appropriate nutrition education are essential because iodine deficiency can be easily prevented by adequate iodine intake. The risk of iodine deprivation during pregnancy needs to be assessed locally over time because it may occur in areas that are not globally recognized as being iodine-deficient.

Keywords: iodine deficiency; pregnancy; Ukraine; urinary iodine concentration

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About the article

Corresponding author: Noboru Takamura, MD, PhD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 8528523, Japan, Phone: +81 95 8197170, Fax: +81 95 8197172


Received: 2012-06-20

Accepted: 2012-08-18

Published Online: 2012-09-18

Published in Print: 2013-04-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Volume 51, Issue 4, Pages 811–816, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2012-0397.

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