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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

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1437-4331
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Volume 52, Issue 1 (Jan 2014)

Issues

Skin autofluorescence as proxy of tissue AGE accumulation is dissociated from SCORE cardiovascular risk score, and remains so after 3 years

Ans H. Tiessen
  • Corresponding author
  • Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  • Email
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/ Willemein Jager
  • Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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/ Nancy C.W. ter Bogt
  • Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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/ Frank W. Beltman
  • Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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/ Klaas van der Meer
  • Department of General Practice, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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/ Jan Broer / Andries J. Smit
  • Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
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Published Online: 2013-04-02 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2012-0825

Abstract

Background: Skin autofluorescence (SAF), as a proxy of AGE accumulation, is predictive of cardiovascular (CVD) complications in i.a. type 2 diabetes mellitus and renal failure, independently of most conventional CVD risk factors. The present exploratory substudy of the Groningen Overweight and Lifestyle (GOAL)-project addresses whether SAF is related to Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) risk estimation (% 10-year CVD-mortality risk) in overweight/obese persons in primary care, without diabetes/renal disease, and if after 3-year treatment of risk factors (change in, Δ) SAF is related to ΔSCORE.

Methods: In a sample of 65 participants from the GOAL study, with a body mass index (BMI) >25–40 kg/m2, hypertension and/or dyslipidemia, but without diabetes/renal disease, SAF and CVD risk factors were measured at baseline, and after 3 years of lifestyle and pharmaceutical treatment.

Results: At baseline, the mean SCORE risk estimation was 3.1±2.6%, mean SAF 2.04±0.5AU. In multivariate analysis SAF was strongly related to age, but not to other risk factors/SCORE. After 3 years ΔSAF was 0.34±0.45 AU (p<0.001). ΔSAF was negatively related to Δbodyweight but not to ΔSCORE%, or its components. At follow-up, SAF was higher in 11 patients with a history of CVD compared to 54 persons without CVD (p=0.002).

Conclusions: Baseline and 3-year-Δ SAF are not related to (Δ)SCORE, or its components, except age, in the studied population. ΔSAF was negatively related to Δweight. As 3-year SAF was higher in persons with CVD, these results support a larger study on SAF to assess its contribution to conventional risk factors/SCORE in predicting CVD in overweight persons with low-intermediate cardiovascular risk.

Keywords: cardiovascular; SCORE risk estimation; skin autofluorescence

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About the article

Corresponding author: Ans H. Tiessen, MD, Department of General Practice, FA 21, University Medical Center Groningen, P.O. Box 196, 9700 AD Groningen, The Netherlands, E-mail:


Received: 2012-11-29

Accepted: 2013-03-07

Published Online: 2013-04-02

Published in Print: 2014-01-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2012-0825.

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