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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter


IMPACT FACTOR 2017: 3.556

CiteScore 2017: 2.34

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2017: 1.114
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2017: 1.188

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1437-4331
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Volume 53, Issue 3

Issues

Uric acid levels in blood are associated with clinical outcome in soft-tissue sarcoma patients

Joanna Szkandera
  • Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
  • Research Unit Genetic Epidemiology and Pharmacogenetics, Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
  • Other articles by this author:
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/ Armin Gerger
  • Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
  • Research Unit Genetic Epidemiology and Pharmacogenetics, Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
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/ Bernadette Liegl-Atzwanger / Michael Stotz
  • Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
  • Research Unit Genetic Epidemiology and Pharmacogenetics, Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
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/ Hellmut Samonigg
  • Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
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/ Ferdinand Ploner
  • Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
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/ Tatjana Stojakovic
  • Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
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/ Thomas Gary
  • Division of Vascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
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/ Andreas Leithner / Martin Pichler
  • Corresponding author
  • Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria
  • Email
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Published Online: 2014-10-15 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2014-0486

Abstract

Background: Recent evidence indicates toward a role of uric acid (UA) as a potential antioxidant. Elevated UA levels were shown to be associated with better survival in various malignancies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic relevance of pre-operative UA levels on cancer-specific survival (CSS) in soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients who underwent curative surgical resection.

Methods: Three hundred and fifty-seven patients with STS were included in the study. Pre-operative serum UA level was measured using an enzymatic colorimetric assay. The effect of UA levels on CSS was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves. To further evaluate the prognostic impact of UA levels, univariate and multivariate Cox proportional models were calculated.

Results: Among the 357 STS patients, cancer-related deaths occurred in 20 (24.7%) of 81 patients with a serum UA level <279.6 µmol/L and in 36 (13%) of 276 patients with a UA level ≥279.6 µmol/L. In univariate analysis, elevated UA levels were significantly associated with increased CSS in STS patients [hazard ratio (HR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.26–0.77, p=0.004]. Furthermore, elevated UA levels remain a significant factor for better CCS in multivariate analysis (HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.23–0.75, p=0.003).

Conclusions: Our study is the first one to demonstrate that higher UA levels are associated with positive clinical outcome in STS patients. UA levels are a simple and cost-effective test for the assessment of the prognosis of STS patients.

Keywords: prognostic marker; soft-tissue sarcoma; uric acid levels

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About the article

Corresponding author: Martin Pichler, MD, Division of Clinical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 15, 8036 Graz, Austria, Phone: +43-316-385-81320, Fax: +43-316-385-13355, E-mail:


Received: 2014-05-06

Accepted: 2014-09-15

Published Online: 2014-10-15

Published in Print: 2015-02-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), Volume 53, Issue 3, Pages 493–497, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2014-0486.

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