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Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM)

Published in Association with the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM)

Editor-in-Chief: Plebani, Mario

Ed. by Gillery, Philippe / Greaves, Ronda / Lackner, Karl J. / Lippi, Giuseppe / Melichar, Bohuslav / Payne, Deborah A. / Schlattmann, Peter


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Volume 53, Issue 9

Issues

Evidence of Crohn’s disease-related anti-glycoprotein 2 antibodies in patients with celiac disease

Dirk Roggenbuck
  • Corresponding author
  • Faculty of Natural Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Grossenhainer Strasse 57, 01968 Senftenberg, Germany
  • Medipan GmbH, Dahlewitz/Berlin, Germany
  • Email
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/ Severine Vermeire
  • Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology, University Hospitals Leuven, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
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/ Ilse Hoffman
  • Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Leuven, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
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/ Dirk Reinhold
  • Institute of Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany
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/ Peter Schierack
  • Faculty of Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Senftenberg, Germany
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/ Alexander Goihl
  • Institute of Molecular and Clinical Immunology, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany
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/ Ulrike von Arnim
  • Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany
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/ Gert De Hertogh / Dimitrios Polymeros
  • Hepatogastroenterology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Attikon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece
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/ Dimitrios P. Bogdanos
  • Faculty of Natural Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Grossenhainer Strasse 57, 01968 Senftenberg, Germany
  • Division of Transplantation Immunology and Mucosal Biology, King’s College London School of Medicine at King’s College Hospital, London, UK
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/ Xavier Bossuyt
  • Faculty of Natural Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Grossenhainer Strasse 57, 01968 Senftenberg, Germany
  • KU Leuven Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Catholic University Leuven and Department of Laboratory Medicine, Immunology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
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Published Online: 2014-11-20 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2014-0238

Abstract

Background: Autoantibodies to exocrine-pancreatic glycoprotein 2 (anti-GP2) are Crohn’s disease (CD) markers. However, CD-specific antibodies have also been found in celiac-disease (CeD) patients, in which type 1 diabetes-specific autoantibodies against endocrine pancreatic targets can be present. We investigated whether anti-GP2 are also present in CeD, a disease like CD which is also characterised by intestinal mucosal inflammation with barrier impairment.

Methods: Antibodies against GP2, tissue transglutaminase (tTG), deamidated gliadin (dGD), glutamic decarboxylase (GAD), and islet antigen-2 (IA2) were tested in sera from 73 CD patients, 90 blood donors (BD), and 79 (58 de novo) CeD patients (2 consecutive sera were available from 40 patients).

Results: IgA and/or IgG anti-GP2 were found in 15/79 (19.0%) CeD patients on at least one occasion, in 25/73 (34.2%) CD patients, and in 4/90 (4.4%) BD (CeD vs. CD, p=0.042; BD vs. CeD and CD, p<0.001, respectively). Amongst the 58 de novo CeD patients, anti-GP2 IgA and/or IgG were present in 11 (19.0%). Anti-GP2 IgA was significantly less prevalent in CeD compared with CD (p=0.004). Anti-GP2 IgA and IgG in CD patients demonstrated a significantly higher median level compared to patients with CeD (p<0.001, p=0.008, respectively). IgA anti-GP2 levels correlated significantly with IgA anti-tTG and anti-dGD levels in CeD Spearman’s coefficient of rank correlation (ρ)=0.42, confidence interval (CI): 0.26–0.56, p<0.001; ρ=0.54, CI 0.39–0.65, p<0.001, respectively.

Conclusions: The presence of anti-GP2 in CeD patients supports the notion that loss of tolerance to GP2 can probably be a manifestation of an autoinflammatory process in this intestinal disorder.

Keywords: celiac disease; Crohn’s disease; glycoprotein GP2; intestinal autoimmunity

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About the article

Corresponding author: Prof. Dr. Dirk Roggenbuck, MD PhD, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Grossenhainer Str. 57, 01968 Senftenberg, Germany, Phone: +49 33708 441716, Fax: +49 33708 441725, E-mail: ; and Medipan GmbH, Dahlewitz/Berlin, Germany

aDimitrios P. Bogdanos and Xavier Bossuyt share senior authorship.


Received: 2014-03-04

Accepted: 2014-10-03

Published Online: 2014-11-20

Published in Print: 2015-08-01


Citation Information: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM), Volume 53, Issue 9, Pages 1349–1357, ISSN (Online) 1437-4331, ISSN (Print) 1434-6621, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2014-0238.

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