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Chemistry International

The News Magazine of IUPAC

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Volume 41, Issue 4

Issues

Elements of the Future

Kit Chapman
Published Online: 2019-10-31 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ci-2019-0406

Abstract

When Dimitri Mendeleev assembled his periodic table in 1869, the heaviest known element was uranium, element 92. As the table filled, it soon became clear that this was the heaviest element that existed in large quantities on Earth. But it was far from the limit of the building blocks of matter.

References

About the article

Kit Chapman

Kit Chapman ( @ChemistryKit) is a science journalist based in Southampton, UK. His first book, Superheavy: Making and Breaking the Periodic Table, was published by Bloomsbury Sigma earlier this year.


Published Online: 2019-10-31

Published in Print: 2019-10-01


Citation Information: Chemistry International, Volume 41, Issue 4, Pages 12–15, ISSN (Online) 1365-2192, ISSN (Print) 0193-6484, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ci-2019-0406.

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©2019 IUPAC & De Gruyter. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. For more information, please visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.Get Permission

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