Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Show Summary Details
More options …

Communications

The European Journal of Communication Research

Ed. by Averbeck-Lietz, Stefanie / d'Haenens, Leen


IMPACT FACTOR 2018: 0.707
5-year IMPACT FACTOR: 1.151

CiteScore 2018: 0.86

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.460
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.580

Online
ISSN
1613-4087
See all formats and pricing
More options …
Volume 32, Issue 3

Issues

Government communication about policy intentions: Unwanted propaganda or democratic inevitability? Surveys among government communication professionals and journalists in Belgium and the Netherlands

Dave Gelders
  • Assistant Professor and PostDoctoral Researcher at the Leuven School for Mass Communication Research, Catholic University of Leuven, E.Van Evenstraat 2A, B 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Rozane De Cock
  • Teaching and Research Assistant at The Leuven School for Mass Communication Research, Catholic University of Leuven, E. van Evenstraat 2A, B 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Peter Neijens
  • Professor at the Amsterdam School of Communication Research ASCoR, University of Amsterdam, Kloveniersburgwal 48, NL 1012 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Keith Roe
  • Professor at the Leuven School for Mass Communication Research, and Vice-Dean at the Faculty of Social Sciences, Catholic University of Leuven, E. van Evenstraat 2A, B 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
  • Email
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2007-09-13 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/COMMUN.2007.021

Abstract

Recent developments in politics, the media, and society have stressed the rising importance of public communication from the government about policies not yet been adopted by Parliament. Government communication professionals and journalists are key figures in this process but conflicting interests mark a tense relationship. Up until now, few empirical studies have been conducted to shed light on the opinions of both professions concerning ‘Communication about Not yet Adopted Policy’ (CNAP). We studied the issue in both the Netherlands and Belgium because research has shown that these countries stand out in regard to debating and reflecting on CNAP. This article maps recent Dutch empirical research and a more elaborated Belgian study, and shows that CNAP is generally accepted by government communication professionals and journalists. Moreover, the Belgian study shows the respondents' opinions regarding the acceptance of CNAP, their arguments, and the conditions CNAP must meet.

Keywords: public communication; public relations; journalism; policy intentions; propaganda

About the article

Published Online: 2007-09-13

Published in Print: 2007-09-19


Citation Information: Communications, Volume 32, Issue 3, Pages 363–377, ISSN (Online) 1613-4087, ISSN (Print) 0341-2059, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/COMMUN.2007.021.

Export Citation

Citing Articles

Here you can find all Crossref-listed publications in which this article is cited. If you would like to receive automatic email messages as soon as this article is cited in other publications, simply activate the “Citation Alert” on the top of this page.

[1]
Charis Rice and Ian Somerville
The International Journal of Press/Politics, 2017, Volume 22, Number 1, Page 92
[2]
Brooke Fisher Liu, Abbey Levenshus, and J. Suzanne Horsley
Journal of Communication Management, 2012, Volume 16, Number 3, Page 220
[3]
Charis Rice, Ian Somerville, and John Wilson
International Journal of Public Administration, 2015, Volume 38, Number 1, Page 4

Comments (0)

Please log in or register to comment.
Log in