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Beiträge zur Tabakforschung International/Contributions to Tobacco Research

The Journal of BTFI GmbH

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1612-9237
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Volume 26, Issue 2

Issues

An Improved Cambridge Filter Pad Extraction Methodology to Obtain More Accurate Water and “Tar” Values: In Situ Cambridge Filter Pad Extraction Methodology

David Ghosh
  • Corresponding author
  • Philip Morris International, Research and Development, Quai Jeanrenaud 5, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
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  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Cyril Jeannet
  • Philip Morris International, Research and Development, Quai Jeanrenaud 5, 2000 Neuchâtel, Switzerland
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2014-07-31 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/cttr-2014-0008

Abstract

Previous investigations by others and internal investigations at Philip Morris International (PMI) have shown that the standard trapping and extraction procedure used for conventional cigarettes, defined in the International Standard ISO 4387 (Cigarettes -- Determination of total and nicotine-free dry particulate matter using a routine analytical smoking machine), is not suitable for high-water content aerosols. Errors occur because of water losses during the opening of the Cambridge filter pad holder to remove the filter pad as well as during the manual handling of the filter pad, and because the commercially available filter pad holder, which is constructed out of plastic, may adsorb water. This results in inaccurate values for the water content, and erroneous and overestimated values for Nicotine Free Dry Particulate Matter (NFDPM). A modified 44 mm Cambridge filter pad holder and extraction equipment which supports in situ extraction methodology has been developed and tested. The principle of the in situ extraction methodology is to avoid any of the above mentioned water losses by extracting the loaded filter pad while kept in the Cambridge filter pad holder which is hermetically sealed by two caps. This is achieved by flushing the extraction solvent numerous times through the hermetically sealed Cambridge filter pad holder by means of an in situ extractor. The in situ methodology showed a significantly more complete water recovery, resulting in more accurate NFDPM values for high-water content aerosols compared to the standard ISO methodology. The work presented in this publication demonstrates that the in situ extraction methodology applies to a wider range of smoking products and smoking regimens, whereas the standard ISO methodology only applies to a limited range of smoking products and smoking regimens, e.g., conventional cigarettes smoked under ISO smoking regimen. In cases where a comparison of yields between the PMI HTP and conventional cigarettes is required the in situ extraction methodology must be used for the aerosol of the PMI HTP to obtain accurate NFDPM/”tar” values. This would be for example the case if there were a need to print “tar” yields on packs or compare yields to ceilings. Failure to use the in situ extraction methodology will result in erroneous and overestimated NFDPM/”tar” values.

References

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About the article

Received: 2014-02-05

Accepted: 2014-05-27

Published Online: 2014-07-31

Published in Print: 2014-07-01


Citation Information: Beiträge zur Tabakforschung / Contributions to Tobacco Research, Volume 26, Issue 2, Pages 38–49, ISSN (Online) 1612-9237, DOI: https://doi.org/10.2478/cttr-2014-0008.

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