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Drug Metabolism and Personalized Therapy

Official journal of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy

Editor-in-Chief: Llerena, Adrián

Editorial Board: Benjeddou, Mongi / Chen, Bing / Dahl, Marja-Liisa / Devinsky, Ferdinand / Hirata, Rosario / Hubacek, Jaroslav A. / Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus / Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse / Manolopoulos, Vangelis G. / Marc, Janja / Melichar, Bohuslav / Meyer, Urs A. / Nair, Sujit / Nofziger, Charity / Peiro, Ana / Sadee, Wolfgang / Salazar, Luis A. / Simmaco, Maurizio / Turpeinen, Miia / Schaik, Ron / Shin, Jae-Gook / Visvikis-Siest, Sophie / Zanger, Ulrich M.

4 Issues per year


CiteScore 2016: 1.40

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2016: 0.413
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2016: 0.537

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2363-8915
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Volume 31, Issue 1

Issues

Progress in pharmacogenetics: consortiums and new strategies

Olalla Maroñas / Ana Latorre
  • Genomic Medicine Group (CIMUS), University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Joaquín Dopazo
  • Biomedical Research Networking Center on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Madrid, Spain
  • Department of Computational Genomics, Centro de Investigación Príncipe Felipe, Valencia, Spain
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Munir Pirmohamed
  • Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology (MCR), University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Cristina Rodríguez-Antona
  • Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain; and ISCIII Center for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Gérard Siest
  • Gene-Environment Interactions in Cardiovascular Physiopathology (IGE-PCV) Unit, Unité de recherche Inserm 1122, University of Lorraine, Nancy, France
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Ángel Carracedo
  • Galician Public Foundation for Genomic Medicine, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Genomic Medicine Group (CIMUS), University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Genetic Group from Health Research Institute (IDIS), CIBERER, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Adrián LLerena
  • (CICAB) Clinical Research Center, Extremadura University Hospital and Medical School, Badajoz, Spain
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2016-02-25 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/dmpt-2015-0039

Abstract

Pharmacogenetics (PGx), as a field dedicated to achieving the goal of personalized medicine (PM), is devoted to the study of genes involved in inter-individual response to drugs. Due to its nature, PGx requires access to large samples; therefore, in order to progress, the formation of collaborative consortia seems to be crucial. Some examples of this collective effort are the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and personalized Therapy and the Ibero-American network of Pharmacogenetics. As an emerging field, one of the major challenges that PGx faces is translating their discoveries from research bench to bedside. The development of genomic high-throughput technologies is generating a revolution and offers the possibility of producing vast amounts of genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms for each patient. Moreover, there is a need of identifying and replicating associations of new biomarkers, and, in addition, a greater effort must be invested in developing regulatory organizations to accomplish a correct standardization. In this review, we outline the current progress in PGx using examples to highlight both the importance of polymorphisms and the research strategies for their detection. These concepts need to be applied together with a proper dissemination of knowledge to improve clinician and patient understanding, in a multidisciplinary team-based approach.

Keywords: next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies; personalized medicine; pharmacogenetics; standardization; translation

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About the article

Corresponding author: Olalla Maroñas, Galician Public Foundation for Genomic Medicine, Santiago de Compostela, Spain, E-mail:

aOlalla Maroñas and Ana Latorre contributed equally to this work.


Received: 2015-11-03

Accepted: 2016-01-25

Published Online: 2016-02-25

Published in Print: 2016-03-01


Citation Information: Drug Metabolism and Personalized Therapy, Volume 31, Issue 1, Pages 17–23, ISSN (Online) 2363-8915, ISSN (Print) 2363-8907, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/dmpt-2015-0039.

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