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Open Engineering

formerly Central European Journal of Engineering

Editor-in-Chief: Ritter, William


CiteScore 2018: 0.91

SCImago Journal Rank (SJR) 2018: 0.211
Source Normalized Impact per Paper (SNIP) 2018: 0.655

ICV 2017: 100.00

Open Access
Online
ISSN
2391-5439
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An advanced CFD model to study the effect of non-condensable gas on cavitation in positive displacement pumps

Aldo Iannetti
  • Corresponding author
  • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, 16 Richmond Street, Glasgow G1 1XQ, Scotland, United Kingdom
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  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ Matthew T. Stickland
  • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, 16 Richmond Street, Glasgow G1 1XQ, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
/ William M. Dempster
  • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Strathclyde, 16 Richmond Street, Glasgow G1 1XQ, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • Other articles by this author:
  • De Gruyter OnlineGoogle Scholar
Published Online: 2015-09-25 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/eng-2015-0027

Abstract

An advanced transient CFD model of a positive displacement reciprocating pump was created to study its behavior and performance in cavitating condition during the inlet stroke. The “full” cavitation model developed by Singhal et al. was utilized, and a sensitivity analysis test on two air mass fraction amounts (1.5 and 15 parts per million) was carried out to study the influence of the dissolved air content in water on the cavitation phenomenon. The model was equipped with user defined functions to introduce the liquid compressibility, which stabilizes the simulation, and to handle the two-way coupling between the pressure field and the inlet valve lift history. Estimation of the performance is also presented in both cases.

Keywords: Cavitation; positive displacement pumps; noncondensable gas effect; CFD

References

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About the article

Received: 2014-12-01

Accepted: 2015-03-28

Published Online: 2015-09-25


Citation Information: Open Engineering, Volume 5, Issue 1, ISSN (Online) 2391-5439, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/eng-2015-0027.

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© 2015. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. BY-NC-ND 3.0

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